The most comprehensive image acquisition in one MRI scan

Physicians love the Prenuvo scan because the sheer volume of images, planes and tissue weights create enough different ways to characterize any abnormality to reduce tremendously the dreaded "unknown lesion" diagnoses.
 

Representative set of images

Below are some of the many images that we acquire on every comprehensive Prenuvo scan.
Aneurysm Detection (Rotation)

This rotating data set is created from the Axial TOF Circle of Willis (COW) images. It gives a nice 3 dimensional view of the Circle of Willis which allows us to localize an aneurysm with precision.

Volumetric Brain (Left/Right)

The T1 MPRAGE acquires volumetric data of the brain. The pixels are 1mm x 1mm x1mm. These tiny voxels (volume pixels) allow us to make precise measurements of your brain volumes. The true value of this data is that we can show any changes over time of your brain volumes between your first and subsequent visits. For this reason you do not receive the volumetric data on your first visit.

Fat/blood detection (Front/Back)

In this sequence, only fat and old blood products are bright. It gives a very nice visual assessment of your body composition. Used in conjunction with the STIR Whole Body, we are able to determine the composition of most things found in the body (fat, fluid, blood, air etc). If the patient follows instructions and holds their breath well during the scan, we will get very nice images of the bowel wall.

Head arterial view (Top/Bottom)

This sequence utilizes MRI’s ability to separate moving substances (in this case, flowing blood) from tissues that are not moving during the scan (brain). In doing so, we are able to clearly visualize the arteries which supply the brain (carotids) as well as the main cluster of arteries of the brain (Circle of Willis, or COW).

Fat sensitive sequence (Top/Bottom)

Fat suppression is commonly used in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to suppress the signal from adipose tissue or detect adipose tissue. It can be used to better identify parts of your body that are high in fat (suppressed with this sequence), or to remove the impact of fat (which is ordinarily bright) from covering up details in your non-fat tissue.

Water-suppressed sequence (Top/Bottom)

This sequence, as its name states, saturates, or nullifies the signal from water. As our organs contain a large amount of water, they are almost invisible in the image. Therefore, what we primarily see is the surrounding fat cells. This sequence is great for assessing the amount and location of fat in the abdomen. There is subcutaneous fat (under the skin) as well as visceral fat (around the organs). Large amounts of visceral fat has been linked to numerous health issues including heart attack, diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke, Alzheimer’s disease as well as breast and bowel cancer.

Detailed Neck (Top/Bottom)

This sequence is focused on the small structures of the neck. It allows us to identify the different glands, lymph nodes, vocal cords and other small structures of the neck. Both fat and fluid are bright on these images, allowing us to obtain a high resolution data set.

Detailed male prostate view (Top/Bottom)

This sequence is designed to assess your prostate in fine detail. We see the central zone of the prostate as a darker region compared to the brighter peripheral zone. With a slice every 3 mm, we are able to see even very small tumors.

Prostate tumor detection (Top/Bottom)

This sequence is designed to assess your prostate in fine detail. We see the central zone of the prostate as a darker region compared to the brighter peripheral zone. With a slice every 3 mm, we are able to see even very small tumors.

Prostate mathematical diffusion (Top/Bottom)

This is a mathematically generated representation of the diffusion data. It shows how the different regions of the prostate react over time. Dark areas on the ADC, which correspond to dark areas on the DWIBS, are representative of a rapidly dividing cluster of cells, which is common with many tumors.

Head suppressing CSF (Top/Bottom)

This is MRI’s go to sequence of the brain. It is able to detect even the most subtle abnormalities. It can visualize tumors, small and large regions of stroke, multiple sclerosis (MS), brain bleeds and head injuries.*Pro tip: A great way to assess the images is to look for symmetry of the right and left sides (hemispheres) of the brain.

Tumor detection (ADC)

The DWIBS ADC is a mathematically generated representation of the diffusion data. It assists in separating out benign and malignant tumors. Dark areas on the ADC, which correspond to dark areas on the DWIBS, are representative of a rapidly dividing cluster of cells, which is common with many tumors. Bright areas on the ADC are more commonly benign entities such as cysts.

Head and Torso DWIBS (Rotation)

This image is a great combination of form and function. It looks really impressive, and it is great for visualizing the three-dimensional location of organs, bones and even tumors. These images work by analyzing the freedom of water molecules to move within the body. With over half of our bodies being made of water, there are a lot of water molecules to look at! In normal tissue, these water molecules are free to move around. In tumors, which are rapidly dividing and growing, the water molecules are restricted from moving around. Note, some normal tissues are dark on this sequence including the spinal cord and lymph nodes.

Tumor detection (Front/Back)

The front to back images are a great tool for visualizing all the abdominal organs together. This sequence analyzes the freedom of water molecules moving within the body. In normal tissue, these water molecules are free to move around. In tumors, which are rapidly dividing and growing, the water molecules are restricted from moving around. Tumors are seen on the images as dark regions, enabling us to see them against the bright background.*Note, some normal tissues are dark on DWIBS including the spinal cord and lymph nodes.

Spine detail (Left/Right)

This sequence is designed to show the spinal cord and nerves and their relationship to the vertebrae and intervertebral discs. A disc bulge is a common condition where the outer layer of the disc weakens either through trauma, or naturally as we age. When this occurs, you can develop symptoms when the disc irritates the nerve which sits next to it. This is the most common cause of 'sciatica'. On the images, look to see if the dark disc which sits between the square vertebral bodies, is protruding into the spinal canal (to the right of the vertebral body).

Fluid sensitive abnormalities (Front/Back)

This sequence is one of our 'abnormality detectors'. It is what we call a fluid sensitive sequence. Simply, fluid is bright and everything else in the image is dark. It can find everything from liver and kidney cysts (benign), to inflammatory conditions such as arthritis to cancer. This sequence is very sensitive to seeing tumors of the neck, chest, abdomen and pelvis, as well as bones.

Fatty liver detector Seq 1 (Top/Bottom)

The two Fatty Liver detector sequences are viewed together by a radiologist. These sequences are used together to assess for, amongst other things, fatty liver disease. If regions of the liver are darker on the Out of Phase images when compared to the In Phase images, then it could be determined that the liver has fat infiltration.The darker the liver on the Out of Phase images, the greater the amount of fat. Fatty liver can progress to cirrhosis and even liver cancer.

Fatty liver detector Seq 2 (Top/Bottom)

The two Fatty Liver detector sequences are viewed together by a radiologist. These sequences are used together to assess for, amongst other things, fatty liver disease. If regions of the liver are darker on the Out of Phase images when compared to the In Phase images, then it could be determined that the liver has fat infiltration.The darker the liver on the Out of Phase images, the greater the amount of fat. Fatty liver can progress to cirrhosis and even liver cancer.

Pelvis fat suppression sequence (Front/Back)

This sequence is used to assess your bladder filling over time. It is compared to images acquired earlier in your scan to assess your bladder filling rate.

Chest, Abdomen & Pelvis T2 BLADE (Top/Bottom)

This series gives a very nice overview of all organs in the body. Both fat and fluid is bright in these images. This sequence allows us to look closely at the composition of tumors or accumulation of fluid in the lungs as well as a detailed assessment of all the abdominal and pelvis organs.

Tumor detection (Top/Bottom)

This sequence works by analyzing the freedom of water molecules to move within the body. With over half of our bodies being made of water, there are a lot of water molecules to look at! In normal tissue, these water molecules are free to move around. In tumors, which are rapidly dividing and growing, the water molecules are restricted from moving around. Tumors are seen on the images as dark regions, enabling us to see them against the bright background. Note, some normal tissues are dark on this sequence including the spinal cord and lymph nodes so this sequence alone is insufficient by itself for identifying cancer.