What the Prenuvo scans cover

The following table lists all of the common conditions that can be covered by a Prenuvo scan. Rarer conditions that are not listed in the table are also reported from time to time. In some cases, either because of the patient or the scan acquisition, not all listed conditions are convered.

Brain aneurysm

A brain aneurysm, (also cerebral or intracranial aneurysm) is an outpouching of an artery of the brain. They usually occur where an artery branches (bifurcation). The pouch of the aneurysm is weaker than the rest of the artery, which causes it to grow, and potentially rupture.

Brain

Calcification of the prostate

Calcification of the prostate gland is an abnormal dense, calcified component of the prostate. They are a relatively common, benign finding. There is a link between prostate calcifications and prostatitis.

Prostate

Bone fracture

A bone fracture, also known as a broken bone, is a partial or complete break in the continuity of the bone. It can be a single fracture line or multiple fractured pieces. Fractures can occur from trauma, stress or from another pathology.

The different types of fractures are:

  • Displaced: the bone breaks into two or more parts and moves to out of alignment
  • Non-displaced: the bone breaks either part of all the way through but maintains alignment
  • Closed: the bone breaks but no puncture or open wound in the skin
  • Open: when the bone breaks and punctures the skin; these fractures are at risk of infection

Fractures are placed into subtypes:

  • Comminuted: broken into several pieces
  • Transverse: fracture line is perpendicular to the long part of the bone
  • Oblique: fracture line is on an angle through the bone
  • Pathologic: caused by a disease that weaken the bone
  • Stress: hairline crack

Healing of the bone starts almost immediately. It can be visualized on an x-ray within 6 weeks in adults.

Bony skeleton and soft tissue

Gallbladder appearance

The gallbladder is normally well seen on a Prenuvo scan.

Occasionally the gallbladder is not visualized if it has been removed, obscured, or rarely congenitally absent.

Gallbladder and biliary system

Tumor of the knee

Bone tumours, or bone cancer, is a primary cancer that starts in the bone or cartilage. The tumours can be benign or malignant. It is more common in children, adolescents and young adults. The most common types of malignant bone tumours in young adults is chondrosarcoma and osteosarcoma. Other non-cancerous types are osteoma,osteoclastoma (giant cell tumours) and osteochondroma. Rarer types of bone cancer are: fibrosarcoma, angiosarcoma, and undifferentiated high-grade pleomorphic sarcoma. The tumour can grown into the bone as well as neighbouring tissue. Most are called sacromas.

A chondrosarcoma is the most common in adults. It originates in the cartilage. It is typically found in the long bones - humerus and femur. It is a slow growing cancer.

Osteosarcoma is second most common bone cancer in adults. It is most often found in the knees, tibia,and long bones. It can also be found in the hips and jaw in older adults.

Soft tissue tumours can also occur. These include: lipomas, fibromas, desmoid tumours, leiomyoma, leiomyosarcoma, schwannoma, liposarcoma, synovial sarcoma, and neurosarcoma. Malignant soft tissue tumours in the ankle are rare.

Knees

Bone island of the ankle

A bone island, also known as enostosis, is a benign, very dense region of compact bone within the normal bone structure. It is generally less than 2cm in size and is usually found incidentally. A condition where multiple bone islands occur is called osteopoikilosis.

Ankles

Esophageal benign leiomyoma

A leiomyoma is the most common benign tumor of the esophagus. They are formed from an overgrowth of smooth muscle.

Esophagus

Esophageal malignancy

There are two common types of esophageal carcinoma. These are squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma arises from the epithelial cells that line the esophagus. Adenocarcinoma arises from the glandular cells in the lower third of the esophagus. Symptoms usually appear after the cancer has infiltrated over 60% of the circumference of the esophagus by which time the carcinoma is in an advanced stage.

The earliest way to detect a developing malignancy in the esophagus is by direct visualization of the lining of the esophagus

Esophagus

Malrotation of kidney

During fetal development the kidneys change position and shape. One of the final changes is when the kidneys move from the pelvis to their final position in the abdomen. During this transition the kidney rotates 90 degrees. In some people this rotation doesn’t complete and the kidney is left in a position in which the orientation of the renal pelvis (the centre of the kidney) is not in the expected position of facing inwards and slightly forward. Most commonly the malrotated kidney’s renal pelvis ends up facing forwards (anteriorly) and the ureters face outwards. In some cases the kidney can be hyper-rotated in which the renal pelvis faces backwards (posteriorly) or reversed rotation where the renal pelvis faces outwards (laterally) along with the ureters.

Kidneys

Degeneration of the knee

Degenerative joint disease or degenerative arthritis (osteoarthritis) is the most common condition to affect joints. It is a chronic condition. It is in two forms: primary and secondary. Primary is less common and occurs without cause or injury. It is hereditary. Secondary is the most common form and caused by mechanical forces such as obesity, previous injury, trauma or joint stress.

Degenerative joint disease occurs when the cartilage breaks down causing the bones to rub together. Typically it occurs in the older population.

Knees

Agenesis of the liver

Agenesis of the liver is a condition where a section of the liver (called a lobe) is absent, even though other anatomical features of the liver are present. Agenesis is considered a congenital (from birth) failure of the liver to develop.

The condition is relatively rare and is typically picked up as an incidental finding from radiology.

Liver

Indeterminant cardiac lesion

An indeterminate lesion of the heart can potentially be a benign or a malignant lesion. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from this scan.

Heart and great vessels

Hemorrhagic cyst of the oral pharynx

Hemorrhagic cysts are abnormal lesions of the neck which have had an episode of bleeding (hemorrhage) within the lesion. This can occur due to trauma, infection or tumor and the bleeding is often associated with an immediate onset of pain and other symptoms.

Oral pharynx

Mucous retention cyst

A mucous retention cyst is an incidental, asymptomatic finding of the sinuses (usually paranasal). They are smooth, outwardly convex soft tissue mass. They generally do not grow larger, but do occasionally spontaneously rupture and therefore disappear.

Sinuses and mastoids

Bladder calculus

A calculus (plural: calculi), also known as a bladder stone, is similar in composition to a kidney stone. Bladder calculi are made of salts and minerals from urine which have not been excreted. Instead, these salts and minerals have been retained in the bladder for an extended period of time, allowing the stone to form. The number, size and composition of bladder stones may vary.

Bladder and ureters

Brain abscess

A brain abscess is a potentially life threatening condition. It can be caused by a local infection such as an ear infection, dental abscess or sinus infection, or by a distant infection such as a lung, heart or kidney infection which has spread to the brain via the bloodstream.

Brain

Mullerian duct anomaly

Mullerian duct anomalies is a type of female genital malformation resulting from abnormal development of the mullerian ducts during the embryonic development. The mullerian ducts develop to form the fallopian tubes, uterus,cervix, and the upper two-thirds of the vagina, Degree of symptoms can vary depending on the defect.

There are six classifications:

  • Class I: Mullerian agenesis (absent uterus).
  • Class II: unicornuate uterus - only one side forms and appears “banana shape” on images.
  • Class III: uterus didelphys(double uterus) - both Mullerian ducts form but fail to fuse, this results in a “double uterus”. It is also possible to have a cervix and partial double vagina.
  • Class IV: Bicornuate uterus (uterus with two horns) - this occurs when the upper part of the uterus fails to fuse. It creates a heart shaped uterus.
  • Class V: Septate uterus (uterine septum or partition) - in this case the mullerian ducts have fused, but the partition between them is still present, splitting the system in two parts. This is the most common malformation.
  • Class VI: Acurate Uterus - a mild indentation of the endometrium at the uterine fundus (some may not consider this an anomaly as there is no definitive depth to define this classification).
  • Class VII: DES uterus - the uterine cavity has a “T-shape” as the result of fetal exposure to a estrogen drug that is no longer used, diethylstilbestrol.

Uterus

Indeterminant nodule of the oral pharynx

A nodule in the oropharyngeal tissues of the neck describe a small lesion which is generally too small to be able to characterized as benign or potentially malignant. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from a single scan.

Oral pharynx

Indeterminant bowel lesion

An indeterminate lesion of the bowel can potentially be a benign or a malignant lesion. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion

Bowel

Inflammation of the thyroid

The thyroid can become inflamed and diffusely enlarged due to many causes. The most common is thyroiditis, of which there are multiple different etiologies, which need to be assessed in conjunction with blood thyroid hormone tests.

Thyroid

Inflammation in the nasal pharynx

The nasal pharynx is composed of a mucosal tissue layer that protects the underlying sensitive tissue from infection, or other injuries. However this area can get irritated and become inflamed by repetitive irritant exposure.

Nasal pharynx

Muscle atrophy with fatty replacement of the bony skeleton

Muscle atrophy is when the muscle either partially or completely wastes/decreases in mass. It can be associated with restricted movement/lack of physical activity or as the result of other conditions or diseases affecting the person.

Muscle atrophy can be broken into three different categories: physiologic, pathologic, and neurogenic. Physiologic is when the muscle is not being used enough. This can occur when a person is confined to a bed, has broken a limb, in places where there is no gravity or have a lifestyle with decreased activity levels. Pathologic is when the a person is suffering from other conditions such as aging, starvation, cancer, HIV, or Cushing disease. Neurogenic atrophy can be the result of injury or a disease that affects the nerves stimulating the muscles. Examples of these are: ALS, carpal tunnel syndrome, Guillain-Barre syndrome, toxins or alcohol, polio or a spinal cord injury.

Bony skeleton and soft tissue

Liver hemangioma

Hemangiomas, or more accurately, cavernous hepatic hemangiomas, are the most common liver tumor. Hemangiomas are benign, and are thought to be congenital (present at birth). This means if you have no hemangiomas detected on your current scan, you should not have any hemangiomas on future scans either.

Hemangiomas are simply an abnormal cluster of blood vessels in ia defined region. They usually do not cause symptoms or harm the function of the liver. Treatment is not needed for hemangiomas that do not cause any symptoms.

Liver

Tethered cord

Tethered cord syndrome occurs when the lower part of the spinal cord is anchored (usually to the sacococcygeal region), causing it to overstretch the spinal cord and nerve roots.

Tethered cord can be primary, where it is an isolated congenital abnormality, or secondary, where it can occur with other abnormalities such as a tumor or after an injury.

Spine

Degeneration of the pelvis and hips

Degenerative joint disease or degenerative arthritis (osteoarthritis) is the most common condition to affect joints. It is a chronic condition. It is in two forms: primary and secondary. Primary is less common and occurs without cause or injury. It is hereditary. Secondary is the most common form and caused by mechanical forces such as obesity, previous injury, trauma or joint stress.

Degenerative joint disease occurs when the cartilage breaks down causing the bones to rub together. Typically it occurs in the older population.

Pelvis and hips

Spinal cord infarct

A spinal cord infarct is due to a stroke which affects the spinal cord. It is quite uncommon. A spinal cord infarct usually causes severe neurological symptoms. The prognosis is generally very poor.

Spine

Bone metastases

Bone metastases or osseous metastatic disease are cancerous lesions that the result of spread from another primary cancer(a cancer somewhere else in the body). They are more common than primary bone cancer. Some of the most common cancers to spread to bones are: breast, prostate, lung, kidney and thyroid.

Metastatic disease affects the regular process of decay and growth of bone. As a result the structure of the bone changes. There are two type of bone metastases, osteoblastic (sclerotic) metastases and osteolytic metastases. Osteoblastic metastases occur when cancer cells invade and cause too many bone cells to form. The bone then becomes very dense. Osteolytic metastases occur when the cancer breaks down too much bone resulting in it being destroyed and weakened. The former is the more common type.

Spine

Hamartoma of the lungs and mediastinum

A hamartoma is the most common benign lung tumor. A hamartoma is slow growing and usually has a smooth edge with the tumor containing fat. It forms as a disorganised collection of tissues which are usually found in the lung; usually fat, connective tissue and cartilage.

Lungs and mediastinum

Brain metastases

Brain metastases are formed by the spread of cancer from other organs to the brain. Metastatic spread is the most common cause of tumors in the brain. The most common cancers to spread to the brain are melanoma, lung and breast cancer.

Brain

Tumor of the lungs and mediastinum

A lung tumor is a descriptor for a lesion that has the potential to be a malignancy of the lung. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in North America. There are more deaths from lung cancer than there are deaths from bowel, prostate, ovarian and breast cancer combined.

Lungs and mediastinum

Breast implants

A ruptured breast implant is a possible complication for women who have both saline filled and silicone gel filled breast implants. A rupture can occur intracapsular, confined by the surrounding fibrous capsule,or extracapsular, when filling exits the implant and into the surrounding breast tissue. The majority of ruptures are intracapsular and account for 85% of the detected cases. Due to the thickness of silicone it does not freely extravasate into the surrounding tissue. Breast implant ruptures have not be associated with cancer, reproductive issues or other conditions.

Breasts

Tumor of the bony skeleton and soft tissue

Bone tumours, or bone cancer, is a primary cancer that starts in the bone or cartilage. The tumours can be benign or malignant. It is more common in children, adolescents and young adults. The most common types of malignant bone tumours in young adults is chondrosarcoma and osteosarcoma. Other non-cancerous types are osteoma,osteoclastoma (giant cell tumours) and osteochondroma. Rarer types of bone cancer are: fibrosarcoma, angiosarcoma, and undifferentiated high-grade pleomorphic sarcoma. The tumour can grown into the bone as well as neighbouring tissue. Most are called sarcomas.

A chondrosarcoma is the most common in adults. It originates in the cartilage. It is typically found in the long bones - humerus and femur. It is a slow growing cancer.

Osteosarcoma is second most common bone cancer in adults. It is most often found in the knees, tibia,and long bones. It can also be found in the hips and jaw in older adults.

Soft tissue tumours can also occur. These include: lipomas, fibromas, desmoid tumours, leiomyoma, leiomyosarcoma, schwannoma, liposarcoma, synovial sarcoma, and neurosarcoma.

Bony skeleton and soft tissue

Focal nodular hyperplasia

Focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) is a benign regenerative tumor of the liver. It is the second most common abnormal liver mass after the hemangioma. FNHs rarely cause symptom.

Liver

Prior fracture of the sacroilliac joint

If a fracture has healed properly then there should be little evidence of it on imaging. However, if a fracture doesn’t heal properly, such as not in the original position (malunion) or if healing doesn’t occur within 6-9 months (non-union or pseudoarthrosis) there may be some identifiable features.

Sacroiliac joints

Transitional cell carcinoma of the kidney

Transitional cell carcinoma of the kidney occurs in the renal pelvis. The renal pelvis is the center of the kidney where urine collects before travelling down the ureters to the bladder. The tissue that lines this area has cells called transitional cells. They are able to bend and stretch without being damaged. Transitional cell carcinoma forms in these cells.

Transitional cell carcinoma can be either high grade or low grade. Low grade is less likely to spread to other areas or have a recurrence. High grade is more likely to metastasize to other parts of the body, like lymph nodes, and has a higher chance of returning after treatment. The grading is assessed by a biopsy.

Transitional cell carcinoma can affect both males and females but most commonly affects males between the ages of 60-70 years old.

Kidneys

Beaver tail liver

A beaver tail liver is a normal variant of the liver anatomy where the left lobe of the liver extends laterally to contact or surround the spleen.

Liver

Multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is a chronic demyelinating disease which involves the brain and less often, the spinal cord. It is the second most common cause of neurological impairment in young adults, second only to trauma.

The lesions can be present without symptoms though the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis requires an event of neurological symptoms to have occurred on more than one occasion.

Brain

Duplex kidney

A duplex kidney is a normal finding. It is where you have two separate collecting systems in a kidney instead of one. You were born with this.

There is a slight increase in likelihood of kidney stones and blockages, which is mostly due to having twice the anatomy as others for stones and obstructions to occur in.

Kidneys

Total size of bladder

Urine enters the bladder via the ureters and exits via the urethra. Typically bladder can hold 300 and 500 ml of urine comfortably for two to five hours. The bladder can be stretched considerably larger and bladder volumes as large as 6000ml have been reported in literature (idiopathic giant bladder). Normally bladder needs to be emptied 6-8 times (250-500ml of urine each time) during 24-hour period. Usually the urinating frequency is lower during night times. In cases where the urge to empty the bladder interferences the sleep you might suffer a condition called nocturia.

When a person gets older bladder and urethral functions deteriorate. These changes might lead to more frequent bathroom visits. The bladder capacity itself rarely decreases during aging.

Bladder and ureters

Atrophied kidney

Atrophic kidney is when the kidney has shrunk to an abnormal size most likely due to chronic kidney disease/renal failure. This could be the result of other diseases that affect the body such as diabetes, chronic urinary tract infections, high blood pressure, heart disease, glomerulonephritis, or polycystic kidney disease.

Kidney athrophy can occur if the kidney has been poorly functioning or been damaged for 3 consecutive month or more.

Atrophic kidney tends to affect the left kidney more often than right.

Kidneys

Congenital spinal canal narrowing

A congenital narrow spinal canal is where the front to back (or anteroposterior AP) dimension of the bony canal where the spinal cord is situated is narrow.

Spine

Prostatitis

Prostatitis is the inflammation of the prostate gland. It is usually occurs as a response to an infection. This inflammation causes swelling of the prostate gland which in turn can affect urination.

Prostate

Indeterminant lesion of the spinal cord

An indeterminant tumor of the spinal cord can potentially be a benign or a malignant lesion. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from this scan.

Spine

Ovary appearance

Absent or not visible ovaries could be due to a few different conditions.

  • As females age and progress through menopause the ovaries shrink and are hard to visualize. In a postmenopausal woman this non-visualization of the ovary is common as the ovaries shrink to the size of a raisin.
  • A congenital malformation where the ovary and fallopian tube never developed, this a rare condition
  • The ovary or ovaries were surgically removed

Ovaries

Lymphoma in the nasal pharynx

Lymphoma is a cancer which arises in the lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. Lymphoma can arise from, or spread to any of the glands and organs throughout the nasopharyngeal tissues of the neck (and many other locations within the body).

Nasal pharynx

Bone marrow edema of the spine

Bone marrow is a semi-solid tissue which is found within the spongy or cancellous portions of bone. It is responsible for the production of new blood cells. Bone marrow edema is the term used when there is a fluid collection within the bone marrow. It is usually presence when there is an underlying condition. Conditions it could be related to can include: trauma, fracture, arthropathy, hypoperfusion, infection, post-operative changes, chemotherapy, bone metastases, or arthritis.

Spine

Knee hemangioma

A bony hemangioma can often be referred to as a few other names, primary intraosseous hemangioma or vascular hamartoma. A hemangioma is a benign vascular malformation that occurs when blood vessels multiply at an abnormal rate. They most commonly occur in the skull and the spine but they can form in any body part. Capillary and cavernous hemangiomas are the most common type of hemangioma to affect bones. The can occur on the surface of the bone or deeper. Often hemangiomas are asymptomatic and are found incidentally on an xray or MRI.

Knees

Muscle tear of the shoulder

A muscle tear is an acute or chronic soft tissue injury that occurs to muscle. The muscle becomes overstretched and receives more physical stress than it can handle. The tears can occur partially or completely. Acute tears tend to happen with recent trauma or injury whereas chronic tears are related to repetitive movement over a long period of time.

Muscle tears are classified by degree of severity: first degree (mildest - some tearing still with full range of motion), second degree (moderate - torn, painful with limited motion) and third degree (severe - torn with limited or no movement).

In the shoulder there are multiple muscles that can be torn: supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, teres minor, and deltoid.

Shoulders

Uterine fibroid

Uterine fibroids are also known as uterine leiomyomas. They are benign smooth muscle(myometrial origin) tumours of the uterus. They are the most common solid benign uterine neoplasm. Rarely do fibroids turn into a malignant tumour.

Fibroids are commonly found incidentally on examinations for other reasons, occur during childbearing years. The size of fibroids can range from millimeters to large bulky masses. In some cases, they can grow large enough to extend up into the upper abdominal cavity.

There are different types of fibroids depending on whether the location is in or on the uterus. The different types are:

  • Intramural: most common type. They are located within the muscular wall of the uterus
  • Subserosal: these are formed outside the uterus
  • Pedunculated: a subserosal fibroid that has a stem that supports the fibroid
  • Submucosal: least common. These develop in the middle muscle layer (myometrium)

Uterus

Splenic cyst

Splenic cysts are benign, congenital (from birth) unfolding of cells which create a fluid filled pouch. They typically grow slowly, and are almost always singular.

Spleen

Renal leiomyoma

A renal leiomyoma is a benign tumour of the kidney. It is made of smooth muscle tissue. They can occur both in the renal cortex and medulla, the outer and inner parts of the kidney. The usually have a distinct capsule and rarely have cystic or calcified portions. They can grow in size anywhere from 0.5cm up to 57cm.

Most people experience no symptoms of a renal leiomyoma and it is discovered incidentally during examinations for another reason.

They can affect both males and females with no specific risk factors. Renal leiomyomas have been associated with tuberous sclerosis(a genetic disorder) and Epstein-Barr viral infection.

Kidneys

Solid thyroid mass

A solid thyroid mass has a high risk of being malignant, based on the irregular features of the thyroid gland. This will require further evaluation and workup as unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of a thyroid lesion from a single scan.

Thyroid

Indeterminant cystic kidney lesion

An indeterminate cystic kidney lesion can potentially be a benign or a malignant lesion. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from this scan.

Kidneys

Cyst of the oral pharynx

Simple cysts are abnormal, fluid-filled sacs that can form in any of the soft tissues of the neck. Simple cysts usually do not cause symptoms or harm the function of the tissue. Treatment is not needed for simple cysts that do not cause any symptoms.

Oral pharynx

Adrenal hemorrhage

Adrenal hemorrhage can be caused by both traumatic and non-traumatic causes. It can affect one or both adrenal glands.

Trauma most commonly affects just one adrenal gland. Usually, when just one adrenal is affected, there are no clinical signs that the adrenal gland is affected. Therefore, it is commonly diagnosed incidentally.

When both adrenal glands are affected, symptoms are often severe, leading to coma and death if steroid replacement therapy is not administered immediately. The most common cause of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage is adrenal vein spasm or thrombosis.

Adrenals

Shrunken liver

Shrunken liver is the reduction in size of the liver. With shrunken liver, the remaining tissue is usually fibrotic and scarred. This is an indicator that the liver has lost its ability to regenerate. This is usually due to chronic liver disease leading to cirrhosis.

Normal liver size is 10-12cm x 20-23cm.

Liver

Bone cyst of the spine

Simple bone cysts are cavities that form in the bone which are filled with fluid. The cysts are usually small and asymptomatic.

Spine

Hepatic adenoma

A hepatic adenoma, also known as a hepatocellular adenoma, is a rare, benign liver lesion. They have been linked to increased estrogen levels, which includes women who take estrogen containing oral contraceptives. They have also been linked to metabolic syndrome (including diabetes) as well as steroid use.

Hepatic adenomas are usually asymptomatic. If they rupture (hemorrhagic) then there is a greater likelihood for abdominal pain and internal bleeding.

Liver

Indeterminant nodule of the nasal pharynx

A nodule in the soft tissues of the neck describe a small lesion which is generally too small to be able to characterize as benign or potentially malignant. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from this scan. A clear medical history may provide valuable insight into the lesion.

Nasal pharynx

Hemangioma of the bony skeleton

A bony hemangioma can often be referred to as a few other names, primary intraosseous hemangioma or vascular hamartoma. A hemangioma is a benign vascular malformation that occurs when blood vessels multiply at an abnormal rate. They most commonly occur in the skull and the spine but they can form in any body part. Capillary and cavernous hemangiomas are the most common type of hemangioma to affect bones. The can occur on the surface of the bone or deeper. Often hemangiomas are asymptomatic and are found incidentally on an xray or MRI.

Bony skeleton and soft tissue

Collapse or closure of the lung

Atelectasis is the partial or complete collapse of part or all of a lung. Atelectasis occurs when the tiny air sacs within the lung become deflated or filled with fluid. It occurs secondary to either something within the lung, or external to the lung compressing the structures. Atelectasis causes decreased blood flowing through the segment of the affected lung, causing decreased oxygenation of the blood which is then pumped to the body’s tissues.

Lungs and mediastinum

Indeterminant cystic lesion of the nasal pharynx

A cystic lesion of the soft tissues of the neck may be benign or could potentially be malignant. Statistically, cystic lesions are less likely to be malignant than solid tumors. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from this scan.

Nasal pharynx

Marburg variant of multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is a chronic demyelinating disease which involves the brain and less often, the spinal cord. It is the second most common cause of neurological impairment in young adults, second only to trauma.

The Marburg variant is characterized by a sudden onset of severe symptoms. For this reason, it is highly likely you are aware you have this condition.

Brain

Rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease that can affect multiple joints in the body. The immune system fails to function properly and attacks the linings of joints. RA can affect other parts of the body, including the nerves, skin, lungs, eyes and heart. Typically RA involves the same joint on both sides of the body. It can have a gradual progression or come on abruptly. Diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis requires a combination of multiple blood tests, imaging and physical examination.

Sacroiliac joints

Mucosal thickening

Mucosal thickening is a nonspecific finding. It describes the appearance of an asymmetry of the bowel wall where a focal area appears thicker than the remaining bowel. Mucosal thickening is potentially due to a benign or a malignant process.

Bowel

Ovarian tumor

Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer affecting women. It accounts for approximately 6% of female malignancies. There are numerous types of tumours that can affect the ovaries.

The cancer can start in the ovary’s germ cells, stromal cells or epithelial cells. Germ cells are the cells inside the ovary that develop into eggs, stromal cells make up the inner part of the ovary and the epithelial cells are the outer layer. Epithelial cell carcinoma is the most common type of ovarian cancer. It accounts for approximately 85-89% of ovarian cancers.

Ovaries

Polycystic liver disease

Polycystic liver disease (PLD) describes the presence of multiple cysts scattered throughout the liver. There are two genetic variants of PLD. One is genetically linked to polycystic kidney disease and Caroli disease. The other is isolated polycystic liver disease, in which there is no association with polycystic disease of other organs.

Liver

Lymphoma in the thyroid

Lymphoma is a cancer which arises in the lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. Lymphoma can arise from, or spread to any of the glands and organs throughout the soft tissues of the neck (and many other locations within the body).

Thyroid

Hemorrhagic cyst of the thyroid

Hemorrhagic cysts are lesions which have had an episode of bleeding (hemorrhage) within the tissue. This is a finding that is often associated with the thyroid, but can occur in other soft tissues of the neck. When the hemorrhage occurs, it is often associated with an immediate onset of pain and other symptoms.

Thyroid

Reactive or inflammatory lymph nodes of the neck

Reactive or inflammatory lymph nodes are a relatively common finding in the neck. These may be present due to a local infection such as tonsillitis, or a systemic autoimmune disorder such as lupus.

Cervical lymph node chain

Adenomyomatosis

Adenomyomatosis is the benign thickening of the gallbladder wall. It can occur naturally, or as a result of chronically inflamed gallbladder (cholecystitis).

Gallbladder and biliary system

Lung metastases

Lung metastases are formed by the spread of cancer from other organs to the lung(s).The most common cancers to spread to the lung are breast, bowel, prostate, bladder, brain and sarcoma.

Lungs and mediastinum

Cyst in the hypopharynx

Simple cysts are abnormal, fluid-filled sacs that can form in any of the soft tissues of the neck. Simple cysts usually do not cause symptoms or harm the function of the tissue. Treatment is not needed for simple cysts that do not cause any symptoms.

Hypopharynx

Enterocele

An enterocele is when the small intestine herniates down into the vaginal passage.

Uterus

Enteritis

Enteritis is the general term used for inflammation of the small bowel. If the stomach is also involved, then the term gastroenteritis is used. This is most commonly the result of a transient infection. In its simple form it is commonly referred to as “a gastro bug” or the “stomach flu” (though it is not related to the flu). Common causes are infection, inflammatory bowel disease and radiation.

Bowel

Urachal remnant

Urachal remnant anomalies are a range of anomalies that occur when the fetal urachus does not disappear after birth. The urachus is a hollow structure that connects the top of the bladder to the umbilicus during fetal development. By the time birth occurs it changes from the urachus to the median umbilical ligaments. If this doesn’t completely occur then the urachus is left open giving a urachal remnant anomaly.

There are four types of anomalies: patent urachus (fistula), urachal cyst, umbilical-urachal sinus, and vesicourachal diverticulum. The most common (approx. 50%), patent urachus, is when the path between the bladder and umbilicus has not completely closed. The second most common (approx 30%), urachal cyst, is a dilatation of the mid urachus filled with fluid. Third most common (approx. 15%), umbilical-urachal sinus, is a dilatation/outpouching at the umbilical end of the urachus. Finally, the least common (approx. 5%), vesicourachal diverticulum, is a dilatation/pouch at the bladder end of the urachus.

There is an increased risk of developing an adenocarcinoma from a urachal remnant.

Bladder and ureters

Indeterminant solid mass of the oral pharynx

A solid mass of the soft tissues of the neck may be benign or could potentially be malignant. As a general rule, the more solid a tumor is, the greater the probability it is malignant. Statistically, greater than 50%of solid tumors are benign. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from this scan.

Oral pharynx

Effusion of the shoulder

Swelling or edema is an abnormal collection of fluid located beneath the skin or in the joint space (joint effusion). It can result in the displacement of other structural components such as fat pads, ligaments, tendons or other bony structures.

Shoulders

Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm

Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a benign type of tumor which originates within the pancreatic duct. As their name implies, these tumors excrete mucus, which in turn can create cysts within the pancreas/pancreatic ducts.

As an IPMN can at any stage evolve to pancreatic cancer, it is known as a precancerous condition. Therefore monitoring or preemptive surgery are options with an IPMN.

Pancreas

Conus level

The conus level is the level of terminal (bottom) end of the spinal cord before it separates into individual nerves.

Spine

Adrenal metastases

Adrenal metastases are most commonly associated with lung, small and large bowel, breast and pancreatic cancer. Usually when there is metastatic disease of the adrenals, it affects both adrenal glands. Occasionally metastatic disease can be one sided.

Adrenals

Developmental venous anomaly

Developmental venous anomaly (DVA) is a congenital malformation of veins which drain normal brain. They were thought to be rare before cross-sectional imaging but are now recognised as being the most common cerebral vascular malformation, accounting for ~55% of all such lesions.

Brain

Bone cyst of the ankle

There are three types of bone cysts: traumatic bone cyst, aneurysmal bone cyst and unicameral bone cyst. They are benign are do not spread to other parts of the body.

Traumatic bone cysts ten to occur in the jaw and facial bones after trauma.

Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABC) are typically found in children and adolescents They are composed of numerous blood-filled channels which creates an expanded lesion within the bone. The cause of these are unknown.

Unicameral bone cysts (simple bone cysts) are cysts or cavities that form in the bone and are filled with fluid. They are considered latent or active depending on their location. Active bone cysts are located near the epiphyseal plate and will continue to grow until it fills the entire diaphysis. Latent cysts are located away from the epiphyseal plate and will heal with treatment or resolve on their own.

Ankles

Enlargement of the lymph nodes in the neck

The enlargement of a gland is not always a pathology problem, but is a possible indicator of an underlying problem as the lymph nodes are filters of fluid in the head and neck region.

Cervical lymph node chain

Biliary cystadenocarcinoma

Biliary cystadenomas are benign cystic lesions of the liver. They arise from cells in the bile ducts. Whilst benign, biliary cystadenomas can evolve to a malignancy called biliary cystadenocarcinoma. Imaging alone cannot distinguish the exact time point that this evolution occurs.

Liver

Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST)

A gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a tumor which develops from connective tissue in the stomach from cells which regulate movement of food through the gastrointestinal system.They form a rounded soft tissue mass that are often large at diagnosis. A GIST has malignant potential.

Esophagus

Ovarian teratoma

An ovarian teratoma is a germ cell tumour. Teratomas contain elements from all three embryological layers: endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm. They contain different tissue types, including, fat, cystic fluid, skin, soft tissues, hair and sometimes calcification including teeth. Ovarian teratomas can be divided into three sub-types: mature cystic ovarian teratoma (dermoid cyst), immature ovarian teratoma and struma ovarii tumour.

  • Mature cystic ovarian teratoma: also known as dermoid cysts; encapsulated tumours with mature tissues or organ components, such as, hair, nails, teeth, sweat glands, eyes, and thyroid tissues (10-20% of ovarian neoplasms)
  • Immature ovarian teratoma: contain immature tissues with some mature elements; typically large, encapsulated masses with a solid portion. They are less common (less than 1% of ovarian teratomas) but tend to be more malignant
  • Struma ovarii tumour: these differ from other ovarian teratomas as they typically contain mainly thyroid tissue (account for 0.3-1% of ovarian tumours)

Ovaries

Soft tissue edema

Soft tissue edema is the accumulation of fluid within the supporting tissues around the bones of the spine.

The most common cause of soft tissue edema is traumatic or overuse injury. Within the spine it can occur between the bones of the spinous processes of the vertebrae (interspinous), it can occur within a muscle, or set of muscles adjacent to the vertebrae (paraspinal), or it can occur within the subcutaneous layers of the lower back.

Spine

Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST)

A gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a tumor which develops from connective tissue in the stomach from cells which regulate movement of food through the gastrointestinal system.They form a rounded soft tissue mass that are often large at diagnosis. A GIST has malignant potential.

Stomach

Uterine position

The uterus can vary position based on a number of factors. It is mostly affected by the bladder and the rectum. The most common position of the uterus is anteverted and anteflexed. As the bladder fills, the uterus gradually becomes more and more erect, until the fundus may be directed backward toward the sacrum when the bladder is completely filled/distended.

The uterus being in a different position than the typical anteverted and anteflexed do not indicated there is a medical issue. A female may feel symptoms like pelvic pressure with retroverted uterus and can be more prone to prolapsing.

Anteverted/anteflexed: cervix angles forwards and the uterus is pointing forward towards the abdominal wall (most common position)

Retroverted: uterus is tipped backwards

Hyperanteflexion: the uterus is tipped too far forwards

Absent: The uterus is not present; usually due to surgery (hysterectomy) or rarely congenital malformation (agenesis)

Uterus

Indeterminant lesion of the bladder and ureters

An indeterminate lesion of the bladder and urethers can potentially be a benign or a malignant lesion. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion

Bladder and ureters

Hydronephrosis

Hydronephrosis is the swelling of a kidney due to the backup of urine. It happens when urine cannot drain out from the kidney to the ureters down to the bladder due to a blockage or obstruction. Hydronephrosis can occur in one or both kidneys.

Hydronephrosis is not a disease itself but occurs when there is either an obstruction of the outflow of urine, or reverse flow of urine already in the bladder (called vesicoureteral reflux).

Kidneys

Fatty infiltration of the pancreas

Fatty infiltration of the pancreas is most often associated with obesity and aging. Outside of the causal factors, fatty infiltration is a benign condition.

Pancreas

Pelvis and hips metastases

Bone metastases or osseous metastatic disease are cancerous lesions that result from spread of another primary cancer (a cancer somewhere else in the body). They are more common than primary bone cancer. Some of the most common cancers to spread to bones are: breast, prostate, lung, kidney and thyroid.

Metastatic disease affects the regular process of decay and growth of bone. As a result the structure of the bone changes. There are two type of bone metastases, osteoblastic metastases and osteolytic metastases. Osteoblastic (sclerotic) metastases occur when cancer cells invade and cause too many bone cells to form. The bone then becomes very dense. Osteolytic metastases occur when the cancer breaks down too much bone resulting in it being destroyed and weakened. The former is the more common type.

Pelvis and hips

Polycystic ovary

Polycystic ovaries is a high number of follicles in the ovaries. It is referred to as polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM). The follicles can measure between 2-9mm and there needs to be more than 12 follicles per ovary. This can also cause the ovaries to appear larger in size

This condition is associated with polycystic ovary syndrome but is not the only criteria required or necessary to be diagnosed. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) requires two out of three criteria for diagnosis. The three criteria are: infrequent or absent periods, high levels of androgens (male hormones) or polycystic morphology. Imaging alone cannot diagnose PCOS.

Ovaries

Prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in men. Prostate cancer is usually slow growing and is often confined to the prostate gland at diagnosis. On occasions it is more aggressive and spreads outside of the prostate quickly.

Prostate

Acoustic schwannoma

An acoustic schwannoma is a benign tumor that develops on the balance (vestibular) and hearing, or auditory (cochlear) nerves leading from your inner ear to the brain

Brain

Indeterminant fat-containing kidney lesion

An indeterminate fat-containing kidney lesion can potentially be a benign or a malignant lesion. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from this scan.

Kidneys

Indeterminant bone lesion of the spine

An indeterminant bone lesion of the spine can potentially be a benign or a malignant lesion. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from this scan.

Spine

Bladder polyp

Bladder polyps are abnormal, protruding tissue growths that can occur in the lining(mucous membrane) of the bladder wall. Polyps can be both benign (non-cancerous) and malignant (cancerous).

Bladder and ureters

Bladder obstruction

Bladder obstruction is a condition where the urine flow from bladder to urethra is reduced or completely blocked. In men this is often linked to prostate hyperplasia. Other common causes include stricture, scarring, and bladder stones. If the cause is not treated the obstruction may lead to other bladder or kidney problems.

Bladder and ureters

Small vessel ischemia

Small vessel ischemia is the term used to describe the changes which occur to the small blood vessels in the brain. Changes to these vessels can damage the white matter of the brain. Mild or patchy small vessel ischemia is a fairly common finding in patients over the age of 60.

Brain

Bone metastases

Bone metastases or osseous metastatic disease are cancerous lesions that the result of spread from another primary cancer (a cancer somewhere else in the body). They are more common than primary bone cancer. Some of the most common cancers to spread to bones are: breast, prostate, lung, kidney and thyroid.

Metastatic disease affect the regular process of decay and growth of bone. As a result the structure of the bone changes. There are two type of bone metastases, osteoblastic metastases and osteolytic metastases. Osteoblastic (sclerotic) metastases occur when cancer cells invade and cause too many bone cells to form. The bone then becomes very dense. Osteolytic metastases occur when the cancer breaks down too much bone resulting in it being destroyed and weakened. The former is the more common type.

Bony skeleton and soft tissue

Ulcerative colitis

Ulcerative colitis is a condition that results in inflammation and ulceration of the colon. It causes inflammation and ulceration of the bowel wall. There is no obvious cause and no definite cure beyond surgery, but there are numerous symptom management options available.

Bowel

Mucosal thickening

Mucosal thickening is a nonspecific finding. It describes the appearance of an asymmetry of the esophagus where the mucosal wall in a focal area appears thicker than the remaining esophagus. Mucosal thickening is potentially due to a benign or a malignant process.

Esophagus

Indeterminant lesion of the lungs and mediastinum

An indeterminate lesion of the lung can potentially be a benign or a malignant lesion. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from this scan.

Lungs and mediastinum

Adrenal cortical carcinoma

Adrenal cortical carcinoma is a very rare but aggressive form of cancer which originates in the outer layer (cortex) of the adrenal gland. It can be hormonally active, where it causes an increase in hormone production, or hormonally inactive, where it maintains normal hormone production.

Adrenals

Spondyloarthropathy of the lumbar spine

Spondyloarthropathy is the medical term for degenerative arthritis in the spine. In the lumbar spine this includes all of the bony facet joints and discs of the back.

Spine

Bowel polyp

A polyp of the bowel is a fleshy outgrowth into the bowel from the bowel wall. They can be either benign (hyperplastic), premalignant (adenoma) or malignant (adenocarcinoma). There is no way of knowing which type of polyp it is, which is why, as a general rule they are all removed on colonoscopy and biopsied.

  • A polyp less than 1cm has a 1% risk of cancer.
  • A polyp that is 1-2cm has a 10% risk of cancer.
  • A polyp greater than 2cm has a 50% risk of cancer.

Bowel

Pansinusitis

Pansinusitis is the term used to describe sinusitis affecting all of the sinuses of the head at the same time.

Sinuses and mastoids

Muscle tear of the knee

A muscle tear is an acute or chronic soft tissue injury that occurs to muscle. A small partial tear can also be referred to as strain. The muscle becomes overstretched and places more physical stress than it can exert on it. The tears can occur partially or completely. Acute tears tend to happen with recent trauma or injury whereas chronic tears are related to repetitive movement over a long period of time.

Muscle tears are classified by degree of severity: first degree (mildest - some tearing still with full range of motion), second degree (moderate - torn, painful with limited motion) and third degree (severe - torn with limited or no movement).

In the knee there are multiple muscles that can be torn: quadriceps femoris, biceps femoris, hamstring, gastrocnemius, tensor fasciae latae, rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, triceps surae, vastus medialis, popliteus, gluteus medius, soleus, and articularis genus.

Knees

Simple cyst of the liver

Simple liver cysts are fluid-filled sacs that form in the liver. Often cysts are single, though some people develop multiple cysts. Simple liver cysts usually do not cause symptoms or harm the function of the liver. Treatment is not needed for simple liver cysts that do not cause any symptoms.

Liver

Ankle metastases

Bone metastases or osseous metastatic disease are cancerous lesions that the result of spread from another primary cancer (a cancer somewhere else in the body). They are more common than primary bone cancer. Some of the most common cancers to spread to bones are: breast, prostate, lung, kidney and thyroid.

Metastatic disease affect the regular process of decay and growth of bone. As a result the structure of the bone changes. There are two type of bone metastases, osteoblastic metastases and osteolytic metastases. Osteoblastic metastases occur when cancer cells invade and cause too many bone cells to form. The bone then becomes very dense (sclerotic). Osteolytic metastases occur when the cancer breaks down too much bone resulting in it being destroyed and weakened. The former is the more common type.

Ankles

Simple cyst of kidney

Simple kidney cysts are fluid-filled sacs that form in the kidneys. Simple kidney cysts usually do not cause symptoms or harm the kidneys. Most simple kidney cysts are found during imaging tests done for other reasons. Treatment is rarely, if ever, needed for simple kidney cysts.

Extremely rarely do simple kidney cysts transform into tumors. This potential can be re-evaluated on your next Prenuvo scan.

It is quite common that kidney cysts change size over time.

Kidneys

Indeterminant lesion of the pancreas

An indeterminant cystic lesion of the pancreas can potentially be a benign or a malignant lesion. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion

Pancreas

Transitional vertebra and accessory ribs

Transitional vertebrae and accessory vertebrae are defined as variant anatomy. While they may remain entirely asymptomatic, it is possible that they could cause pain by lack of mobility, soft tissue irritation, or nerve compression anytime now or in the future. Thus medical history and preventing irritation to these potentially susceptible areas is invaluable. The understanding of the variant anatomy is also important when symptoms occur and essential if surgery is planned.

Spine

Spinal cord metastases

The spinal cord (intramedullary metastasis) and CSF space (leptomeningeal metastastis) are rare, but possible locations for cancer to spread to. These locations are rarely affected early in the disease progression.

Spine

Bursitis of the pelvis and hips

A bursa is a fluid-filled sac that cushion and lubricates bones and tendons when they move. The body is comprised of over 150 bursae. Bursitis is an inflamed or swollen bursa. In the pelvis and hip region there are twenty bursae.

The bursae commonly affected are:

  • Iliopsoas bursa: largest bursa of the body and beneath iliopsoas, beside the pectineus muscle and the ASIS
  • Subgluteus bursa: also known as the greater trochanteric bursa, located between the greater trochanter and gluteus maximus tendon
  • Ischiogluteal bursa: sits between the gluteus maximus and ischial tuberosity
  • Gluteofemoral bursa: sits deep next to the iliotibial band and tensor fascia lata distal to the greater trochanteric bursa
  • Subgluteus medius bursa: sits deep to the tendon at the superior end of the lateral facet
  • Subgluteus minimus bursa: lies beneath the minimus tendon at the anterior facet
  • Ischiofemoral bursa: sits between quadratus femoris and ischium of the lesser trochanter
  • Obturator internus bursa: lies between the internus muscle and ischium
  • Obturator externus bursa: lies between the tendon and the ischiofemoral capsular ligaments

Pelvis and hips

Indeterminant solid kidney lesion

An indeterminate solid kidney lesion can potentially be a benign or a malignant lesion. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from this scan.

Kidneys

Cancer of the bladder and ureters

Transitional cell carcinoma, also known as urothelial carcinoma, is a malignant type of urinary tract cancer that is found in the inside lining, urothelium, of the bladder. It is the most common type of bladder cancer.

Bladder and ureters

Iron deposition

Iron deposition, (which leads to iron overload, or hemochromatosis) is a condition in which the liver accumulates and stores a higher than normal amount of iron. The most common causes are hereditary hemochromatosis, and transfusional iron overload from repeated blood transfusions. The heart can also be affected by this condition.

Liver

Granuloma of the inner ear or mastoid air cells

Granulomas can occur in the mastoid air cells as well as the middle ear. They are a nodular inflammatory lesion which is formed from granulation tissue. Granulomas are prone to bleeding and are a common cause for bleeding into the eardrum.

Sinuses and mastoids

Pre-kidney stone / proteinaceous cyst

Before kidney stones become solid, they appear as a protein and calcium filled cystic structure. This dense cyst has the potential to become either a kidney stone, or disintegrate by dilution.

Kidneys

Bone marrow edema of the knee

Bone marrow is a semi-solid tissue which is found within the spongy or cancellous portions of bone. It is responsible for the production of new blood cells. Bone marrow edema is the term used when there is a fluid collection within the bone marrow. It is usually present when there is an underlying condition. Conditions it could be related to can include: trauma, fracture, arthropathy, hypoperfusion, infection, post-operative changes, chemotherapy, bone metastases, or arthritis.

Knees

Prostate appearance

Prostate

Nabothian cyst

A nabothian cyst is a mucus-filled cyst on the surface of the cervix. The mucus, which can be pale yellow to amber in colour, is secreted from the cervical glands. Nabothian cysts are also known as cervical cysts, mucinous retention cysts, or epithelial cysts. There are a benign finding and fairly common finding. They can range from a few millimeters to as large as four centimeters in diameter.

Uterus

Osteitis condensans ilii

Osteitis condensans ilii is a benign sclerosis/increased density of the ilium adjacent to the SI joint. The ilium is the pelvic portion of the SI joint. It typically occurs bilaterally and has a triangular shape.

Sacroiliac joints

Bowel lymphoma

Lymphoma can be found throughout the gastrointestinal tract, with the small bowel being the most common site for it (40%). It is usually a secondary site for lymphoma to spread to, not a primary location. When primary, it is more likely to occur with patients with HIV/AIDS, celiac disease or patients who have had an organ transplant.

Bowel

Metastases of the oral pharynx

Metastatic disease of the soft tissues of the neck occurs when cancer spreads from another location in the body and seeds in the neck tissues. The seeding can occur in glands, organs, muscles or lymph nodes of the neck.

Oral pharynx

Biliary cancer

There are two forms of biliary cancer which are closely related. These are gallbladder cancer and cholangiocarcinoma. Their names describe where the cancer originates. There are good outcomes with early diagnosis for both of these cancers. If diagnosed late, once symptomatic, outcomes are much poorer.

Gallbladder and biliary system

Breast cancer

Breast cancer is second most common type of cancer affecting women. It can also occur in men.

Breast cancer, as with other cancers, starts within cells. The cells become abnormal and start to multiple without dying. This results in tissue becoming cancer. Breast cancer can also spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. There are different types of cancer which can be categorized based on where they occur.

  • Ductal carcinoma: occurs in the lining of the ducts which carry milk from the glands to the nipples
  • Lobular carcinoma: occurs in the lobules, glands where the milk is made
  • Some less common types of cancer are: inflammatory breast cancer, Paget disease and triple negative breast cancer.
  • Some rare types of breast cancer are: non-Hodgkin lymphoma, melanoma and soft tissue sarcoma

If the cancer is referred to as in situ this means the cancer is still located in its original location and not grown to surrounding tissue. Invasive is the a term that is used when the cancer has spread to its surrounding tissues.

Mammography is an important screening tool to use in addition to the Prenuvo scan to screen for calcifications associated with breast cancer.

Breasts

Absent kidney

Absent kidney, also known as renal agenesis, is a condition when the kidney never formed during fetal development

Agenesis can occur bilaterally but it more common unilaterally. It is not a major health concern as long as the other kidney is healthy. It is usually detected during prenatal ultrasounds.

Kidneys

Enlarged heart

An enlarged heart is not a medical condition per se. It is a result of a medical condition. Certain medical conditions can cause the heart muscle, or the size of one of the heart chambers to grow. An enlarged heart may be temporary and can return to normal after treatment, or it may be permanent.

Heart and great vessels

Lymphangioma of the liver

A hepatic lymphangioma is an area of dilated lymphatic drainage regions in the liver. They are rare and benign. Most lymphangiomas are asymptomatic.

Liver

Schmorl's node

Schmorl’s nodes are protrusions of the intervertebral discs through the vertebral body endplates. These protrusions may contact the marrow of the vertebrae, leading to inflammation of the vertebrae.

Spine

Hemangioma of the adrenal gland

An adrenal hemangioma is a rare, benign tumor of the adrenal gland. This is usually an incidental finding.

Adrenals

Mastoiditis

Mastoiditis is the inflammation or infection of the mastoid air cells, which are located in the skull, behind the ears. It often develops as a result of a middle ear infection. If infection is left untreated, mastoiditis can lead to an infection in the brain.

Sinuses and mastoids

Adrenal cyst

Adrenal cysts are rare, the majority of which are incidental findings. Adrenal cysts may be classified as simple cysts, pseudocysts, or hydatid cysts depending on their cause.

Adrenals

Gallstone

Gallstones (cholecystolithiasis) are stones which are formed and located in the gallbladder. They are formed by the hardening of bile products. About 80% of people with gallstones never have symptoms.

Gallbladder and biliary system

Muscle atrophy with fatty replacement of the pelvis and hips

Muscle atrophy is when the muscle either partially or completely wastes/decreases in mass. It can be associated with restricted movement/lack of physical activity or as the result of other conditions or diseases affecting the person.

Muscle atrophy can be broken into three different categories: physiologic, pathologic, and neurogenic. Physiologic is when the muscle is not being used enough. This can occur when a person is confined to a bed, has broken a limb, in places where there is no gravity or have a lifestyle with decreased activity levels. Pathologic is when the a person is suffering from other conditions such as aging, starvation, cancer, HIV, or Cushing disease. Neurogenic atrophy can be the result of injury or a disease that affects the nerves stimulating the muscles. Examples of these are: ALS, carpal tunnel syndrome, Guillain-Barre syndrome, toxins or alcohol, polio or a spinal cord injury.

Pelvis and hips

Total size of prostate

The prostate is usually approximately up to 30ml which equals roughly about the size of a ping pong ball. During aging the prostate enlarged and might start compressing the base of the bladder or constrict urethra, which is why many prostate issues are related to urination.

Prostate

Renal cell carcinoma

Renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of kidney cancer. It originates in the very small tubes in the kidney that transport urine, lining of the proximal convoluted tubules. Quite often it occurs without symptoms and this results in the disease being found in later stages when it has spread to other parts of the body.

Renal cell carcinoma is also associated with a number of paraneoplastic syndromes which are conditions caused by either the hormones produced by the tumour or the by the body’s attack on the tumour. They are present in about 20% of people with renal cell carcinoma.

If renal cell carcinoma is found in the early stages, and not spread to other areas of the body (metastasized), the five year survival rate is 65-90%. The survival rate becomes significantly lower when cancer has spread.

Kidneys

Gallbladder septation

A septation, or division, can occur in any of the biliary anatomy. With a septation, or septations, the gallbladder or bile duct is divided into multiple compartments. It is a congenital anomaly which is very rare and mostly an incidental finding.

Gallbladder and biliary system

Phrygian cap

A Phrygian cap is the folding of the fundus of the gallbladder back onto the gallbladder body. This is the most common normal anatomical variant of the gallbladder. It is benign and does not cause symptoms.

Gallbladder and biliary system

Sacroiliitis

Sacroiliitis is when inflammation occurs in one or both of the SI joints.

Sacroiliac joints

Bone cyst of the shoulder

There are three types of bone cysts: traumatic bone cyst, aneurysmal bone cyst and unicameral bone cyst. They are benign are do not spread to other parts of the body.

Traumatic bone cysts ten to occur in the jaw and facial bones after trauma.

Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABC) are typically found in children and adolescents They are composed of numerous blood-filled channels which creates an expanded lesion within the bone. The cause of these are unknown.

Unicameral bone cysts (simple bone cysts) are cysts or cavities that form in the bone and are filled with fluid. They are considered latent or active depending on their location. Active bone cysts are located near the epiphyseal plate and will continue to grow until it fills the entire diaphysis. Latent cysts are located away from the epiphyseal plate and will heal with treatment or resolve on their own.

Shoulders

Spondyloarthropathy of the thoracic spine

Spondyloarthropathy is the medical term for degenerative arthritis in the spine. In the thoracic spine this includes all of the bony facet joints and discs of the mid and upper back. Additionally arthritis can also affect the area where the ribs attach to the spine

Spine

Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis is characterized by inflammation of the pancreas. It can be acute or chronic.

Pancreas

Ductal adenocarcinoma

Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common form of pancreatic cancer. It is an aggressive form of pancreatic cancer which as a poor prognosis.

Pancreas

Indeterminant thyroid nodule

A nodule of the thyroid may be benign or could potentially be malignant. As a general rule, the more irregular features and growth a nodule has, the greater the probability it is malignant. Statistically, greater than 50% of nodules are benign. Multiple nodules have a lower risk of cancer and are commonly associated with goitre. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of a nodule from a single scan.

Thyroid

Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM)

Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an autoimmune disease where a brief, but widespread inflammatory event occurs which damages the protective coating of nerves (myelin). ADEM often occurs after a viral or bacterial infection. It has also been shown to occur rarely after certain vaccinations.

Spine

Rectocele

Rectocele is also known as prolapsed rectum. This is the result of the muscles and connective tissue between the rectum and vaginal wall becoming weak and stretched. The rectum then bulges into the vagina.

Uterus

Hernia of the bladder

A hernia is when tissue or an organ moves into a cavity where it doesn’t normally sit. In the case of bladder hernia it is when the bladder moves into the scrotal sac, inguinal canal or femoral canal. Bladder herniation into the scrotum is also called scrotal cystocele.

Bladder and ureters

Partially resected liver

A partial liver resection is the surgical removal of a portion of the liver.

Liver

Glioma

A glioma is a brain tumor which arises from any of the glial cells of the brain. These tumors are either diffuse, which tend to have a worse prognosis, or localized, which have a better prognosis.

Brain

Thyroid appearance

The thyroid gland does not have normal appearance. This can be due to surgery, or in rare causes congenital abnormalities such as a lingual thyroid.

Thyroid

Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis

Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XGP) is rare type of chronic inflammation that occurs in the kidneys. It is commonly associated with proteus or E.Coli type infections. It results in the destruction of the renal parenchyma (functional tissue) by forming granulomatous tissue. This tissue is made of abscess formation and dead cells which causes severe kidney destruction.

A common finding with XGP is Staghorn calculus. This is a renal calcification, like a kidney stone, that gets its name from the shape it forms in the area of the renal pelvis. It happens with recurrent urinary tract infections and causes blockages of the kidney.

Anyone can get xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis but typically affects middle age to elderly people. Women are twice as likely to be affects due to more frequently of urinary tract infections. There is also increased number of cases in people with diabetes.

Kidneys

Syrinx

A syrinx is defined by the dilation of the central canal of the spinal cord, or a cystic dissection of the central canal which forms a collection of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). These two entities are not easily differentiated on imaging, and clinically there is no difference between the two types, nor a difference in the severity of symptoms between them.

Spine

Accessory spleen

An accessory spleen (also known as splenunculus or a splenule) is a small nodule of splenic tissue which is not connected to the rest of the spleen. They are benign and asymptomatic.

Spleen

Bone marrow edema of the bony skeleton

Bone marrow is a semi-solid tissue which is found within the spongy or cancellous portions of bone. It is responsible for the production of new blood cells. Bone marrow edema is the term used when there is a fluid collection within the bone marrow. It is usually presence when there is an underlying condition. Conditions it could be related to can include: trauma, fracture, hypoperfusion, infection, post-operative changes, chemotherapy, bone metastases, or arthritis.

Bony skeleton and soft tissue

Muscle atrophy with fatty replacement of the knee

Muscle atrophy is when the muscle either partially or completely wastes/decreases in mass. It can be associated with restricted movement/lack of physical activity or as the result of other conditions or diseases affecting the person.

Muscle atrophy can be broken into three different categories: physiologic, pathologic, and neurogenic. Physiologic is when the muscle is not being used enough. This can occur when a person is confined to a bed, has broken a limb, or is in a place where there is no gravity or have a lifestyle with decreased activity level. Pathologic is when the a person is suffering from other conditions such as aging, starvation, cancer, HIV, or Cushing disease. Neurogenic atrophy can be the result of injury or a disease that affects the nerves stimulating the muscles. Examples of these are: ALS, carpal tunnel syndrome, Guillain-Barre syndrome, toxins or alcohol, polio or a spinal cord injury.

Knees

Hemorrhagic cyst of the nasal pharynx

Hemorrhagic cysts are abnormal lesions of the neck which have had an episode of bleeding (hemorrhage) within the lesion. This is a finding that is often associated with the thyroid, but can occur in other soft tissues of the neck, particularly if there has been trauma or an infection. This is why a good medical history is important. When the hemorrhage occurs, it is often associated with an immediate onset of pain and other symptoms.

Nasal pharynx

Bowel adenocarcinoma

Adenocarcinomas are the most common type of cancer in both the large and small bowel. As with other cancers, it occurs due to a mutation of a gene. The tumor usually starts out as a polyp, and if untreated, can evolve into adenocarcinoma of the bowel. It is estimated that half of all bowel cancers are related to lifestyle, with a quarter of all bowel cancers being preventable.

Bowel

Pheochromocytoma

Pheochromocytoma (PCC) is a tumor of the adrenal glands or sympathetic nervous system. Most cases arises from the inner part (also known as the medulla) of the adrenal gland and affect on the (epinephrine/adrenalin hormone secretion of the gland. The most common symptom is increased blood pressure. It is relative rare finding and often benign (rare risk of metastatic spread). However, due to wide ranging effect of hormone secretion, it can result in a life threatening condition if not treated properly.

Adrenals

Cholecystitis

Cholecystitis is inflammation of the gallbladder. 90% of cases are due to a gallstone blocking the cystic duct. A “gallbladder attack” usually precedes cholecystitis. Gallbladder attack refers to the blocked flow of bile which leads to bile accumulation in the gallbladder. Occasionally increased pressure causes gallbladder rupture. This leads to sudden pain in the upper right side or middle of the abdomen.

Gallbladder and biliary system

Arteriovenous malformation

An arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an abnormal collection of arteries and veins in the brain. Instead of having a capillary bed in between, an AVM is a direct connection between arteries and veins.

Brain

Lymphoma of the oral pharynx

Lymphoma is a cancer which arises in the lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. Lymphoma can arise from, or spread to any of the glands and organs throughout the soft tissues of the neck (and many other locations within the body).

Oral pharynx

Riedel lobe

A Riedel lobe is a common, normal anatomical variant of the liver. It is a downward projection of the right lobe of the liver toward the pelvis. The Riedel lobe contains normal liver tissue.

Liver

Muscle tear of the ankle

A muscle tear is an acute or chronic soft tissue injury that occurs to muscle. A partial tear is also referred to as strain. The muscle becomes overstretched and places more physical stress than it can exert on it. The tears can occur partially or completely. Acute tears tend to happen with recent trauma or injury whereas chronic tears are related to repetitive movement over a long period of time.

Muscle tears are classified by degree of severity: first degree (mildest - some tearing still with full range of motion), second degree (moderate - torn, painful with limited motion) and third degree (severe - torn with limited or no movement).

In the ankle there are multiple muscles that can be torn: peroneus longus, peroneus brevis, gastrocnemius, soleus, posterior tibialis, and anterior tibialis.

Ankles

Pericardial fat

Pericardial fat refers to the layer of fat surrounding the heart. It is primarily situated around the left ventricle, which can lead to increased pressure on the heart muscle (myocardium). This can lead to a thickening of the myocardium which, in turn, can lead to the myocardium working less effectively.

Heart and great vessels

Bowel mass

A concerning mass is seen in the bowel. Its characteristics by MRI cannot classify what type of tumor type it may be, and therefore further investigation is necessary.

Bowel

Tumor of the pelvis and hips

Bone tumours, or bone cancer, is a primary cancer that starts in the bone or cartilage. The tumours can be benign or malignant. It is more common in children, adolescents and young adults. The most common types of malignant bone tumours in young adults is chondrosarcoma and osteosarcoma. Other non-cancerous types are osteoma,osteoclastoma (giant cell tumours) and osteochondroma. Rarer types of bone cancer are: fibrosarcoma, angiosarcoma, and undifferentiated high-grade pleomorphic sarcoma. The tumour can grown into the bone as well as neighbouring tissue. Most are called sacromas.

A chondrosarcoma is the most common in adults. It originates in the cartilage. It is typically found in the long bones - humerus and femur. It is a slow growing cancer.

Osteosarcoma is second most common bone cancer in adults. It is most often found in the knees, tibia,and long bones. It can also be found in the hips and jaw in older adults.

Soft tissue tumours can also occur. These include: lipomas, fibromas, desmoid tumours, leiomyoma, leiomyosarcoma, schwannoma, liposarcoma, synovial sarcoma, and neurosarcoma. Malignant soft tissue tumours in the ankle are rare.

Pelvis and hips

Hemangioma of the spleen

A splenic hemangioma, while rare, is the second most common splenic tumor. It is a benign slow flowing venous malformation. They are thought to be congenital (existing from birth). They are simply an abnormal cluster of blood vessels in a confined region. Hemangiomas usually do not cause symptoms or harm the function of the spleen. Treatment is not needed for hemangiomas that do not cause any symptoms.

Spleen

Septation in the bladder and ureters

Septation of the bladder is when the bladder is divided either completely or partially into compartments separated by tissue. There are two categories of bladder septation: congenital and pathological. Congenital septation is a rare occurrence that occurs during fetal development. Pathological septation can occur due to scarring from surgeries, chronic infections or other conditions.

Bladder and ureters

Liver abscess

A liver abscess is a pus filled benign lesion of the liver. The abscess usually accumulates secondary to an acute infections from other origins such as an inflamed gallbladder (cholecystitis), appendicitis or diverticulitis. The infective pus migrates from the initial infection site via the portal vein.

Liver

Degeneration of the ankle

Degenerative joint disease or degenerative arthritis (osteoarthritis) is the most common condition to affect joints. It is a chronic condition. It is in two forms: primary and secondary. Primary is less common and occurs without cause or injury. It is hereditary. Secondary is the most common form and caused by mechanical forces such as obesity, previous injury, trauma or joint stress.

Degenerative joint disease occurs when the cartilage breaks down causing the bones to rub together. Typically it occurs in the older population.

Ankles

Pleural effusion

Pleural effusion means abnormal accumulation of fluid in the pleural cavity between the chest wall and lungs. Excess fluid presses the lung and can make breathing harder. The causes of a pleural effusion are varied. It can for example be caused by the heart’s decreased ability to pump blood, a lung infection, liver or kidney disease, or even some medications. The reason for a pleural effusion is not necessarily obvious from your scan.

Lungs and mediastinum

Mucinous cystadenoma

A mucinous cystadenoma is a benign tumor of the pancreas. When discovered, they are usually large (larger than 4cm). They are considered a premalignant lesion hence are usually surgically removed.

Pancreas

Pancreatic pseudocyst

A pseudocyst is the most common cystic lesion of the pancreas. It is a common result of acute or chronic pancreatitis. A pseudocyst is a small or large collection of pancreatic juices, which are often encapsulated, which occur as a result of the pancreatic duct being damaged due to pancreatitis which results in pancreatic juices leaking and causing hemorrhagic fat necrosis. The cysts can grow quite large (over 10cm)

Pancreas

Mucocele

A mucocele of the sinuses is the formation of a cyst within the sinuses which contains mucus. A mucocele can expand through the walls of adjacent bone, making them potentially problematic when they grow. They have the potential to press on the optic nerves and even brain tissue if the expansion progresses.

Sinuses and mastoids

Dermoid

A dermoid cyst, also known as a mature cystic ovarian teratoma, is a common type of ovarian condition. They can be present from birth but slow growing (1-2mm per year). It may take many years before it is visible or found on examinations. It is cystic growth that is formed of different types of tissues such as hair, fluid, teeth or skin. Complications, while rare, can occur. The complications are torsion, rupture, infection and malignancy.

Ovaries

Scar of the lung

Lung scarring usually occurs as a result of inflammation of lung tissue. This scarring reduces the elasticity of the lung tissue. A small amount of scarring will have little effect on lung function, but a large amount of scarring can make oxygen transfer difficult, leading to shortness of breath and lack of oxygen to the body.

Lungs and mediastinum

Serous cystadenoma

A serous cystadenoma is a benign tumor of the pancreas. They are often clustered. Most people with a serous cystadenoma are asymptomatic. It is extremely rare for it to undergo a malignant transformation. Small serous cystadenomas are very slow growing (1mm per year).

Pancreas

Metastases in the neck lymph nodes

Metastatic disease of the soft tissues of the neck occurs when cancer spreads from another location in the body and seeds in the neck tissues. The seeding can occur in glands, organs, muscles or lymph nodes of the neck.

Cervical lymph node chain

Hemorrhagic cyst of the hypopharynx

Hemorrhagic cysts are abnormal lesions of the neck which have had an episode of bleeding (hemorrhage) within the lesion. This is a finding that is often associated trauma, but can be due to other causes including tumor. When the hemorrhage occurs, it is often associated with an immediate onset of pain and other symptoms.

Hypopharynx

Tumor of the shoulder

Bone tumours, or bone cancer, is a primary cancer that starts in the bone or cartilage. The tumours can be benign or malignant. It is more common in children, adolescents and young adults. The most common types of malignant bone tumours in young adults is chondrosarcoma and osteosarcoma. Other non-cancerous types are osteoma,osteoclastoma (giant cell tumours) and osteochondroma. Rarer types of bone cancer are: fibrosarcoma, angiosarcoma, and undifferentiated high-grade pleomorphic sarcoma. The tumour can grown into the bone as well as neighbouring tissue. Most are called sacromas.

A chondrosarcoma is the most common in adults. It originates in the cartilage. It is typically found in the long bones - humerus and femur. It is a slow growing cancer.

Osteosarcoma is second most common bone cancer in adults. It is most often found in the knees, tibia,and long bones. It can also be found in the hips and jaw in older adults.

Soft tissue tumours can also occur. These include: lipomas, fibromas, desmoid tumours, leiomyoma, leiomyosarcoma, schwannoma, liposarcoma, synovial sarcoma, and neurosarcoma. Malignant soft tissue tumours in the ankle are rare.

Shoulders

Endocrine malignant cancer

Endocrine tumors of the pancreas are a range of tumors which arise from hormone producing cells of the pancreas. They can be syndromic, in which they secrete enough hormone to cause a chemical disturbance in the body, or non-syndromic if they do not affect function. They are usually metastatic at diagnosis.

Pancreas

Appendicitis

Appendicitis is most commonly caused by a calcified “stone” of feces which obstructs the appendix. This will cause the appendix to form mucus and swell. As mucus continues to be produced, pressure increases. This then restricts the blood vessels of the appendix walls, the walls to start to die. This can lead to the appendix bursting.

Bowel

Hernia

A hernia is when tissue or an organ bulges/moves into a cavity where it doesn’t normally sit. In the case of a groin hernia it is when the intra-abdominal fat or bowel moves into the scrotal sac, inguinal canal or femoral canal.

Bowel

Sacroiliac joint bone marrow edema

Bone marrow is a semi-solid tissue which is found within the spongy or cancellous portions of bone. It is responsible for the production of new blood cells. Bone marrow edema is the term used when there is a fluid collection within the bone marrow. It is usually presence when there is an underlying condition. Conditions it could be related to can include: trauma, fracture, arthropathy, hypoperfusion, infection, post-operative changes, chemotherapy, bone metastases, or arthritis.

Sacroiliac joints

Spondyloarthropathy of the cervical spine

Spondyloarthropathy is the medical term for degenerative arthritis in the spine. In the cervical spine this includes all of the bony facet as well as uncovertebral joints and discs of the neck.

Spine

Biliary cystadenoma

Biliary cystadenomas are benign cystic lesions of the liver. They arise from cells in the bile ducts. While benign, biliary cystadenomas can evolve to a malignancy called biliary cystadenocarcinoma. Imaging alone cannot distinguish the exact time point that this evolution occurs.

Liver

Myxoma

A myxoma is the most common benign tumor of the heart, Myxomas account for 50% of all benign heart tumors. The majority of myomas originate in the left atrium (almost 90%).

Heart and great vessels

Cystocele

Cystocele is also known as prolapsed bladder. This is the result of the muscles and connective tissue between the bladder and vaginal wall becoming weak and stretched. The bladder then bulges into the vagina.

Quite often the cystocele occurs with prolapsing of the urethra. Together this condition is called cystourethrocele.

Bladder and ureters

Bone marrow edema of the ankle

Bone marrow is a semi-solid tissue which is found within the spongy or cancellous portions of bone. It is responsible for the production of new blood cells. Bone marrow edema is the term used when there is a fluid collection within the bone marrow. It is usually presence when there is an underlying condition. Conditions it could be related to can include: trauma, fracture, arthropathy, hypoperfusion, infection, post-operative changes, chemotherapy, bone metastases, or arthritis.

Ankles

Esophageal polyp

An esophageal polyp is a benign submucosal tumor. It can grow significantly and cause difficulty swallowing. They are most common in the upper third of the esophagus.

Esophagus

Renal papillary adenoma

Renal papillary adenoma is a benign kidney tumour. The are tumours made of epithelial tissue and typically measure less than 5mm. When they increase beyond 15mm in size they are then a concern for renal cell carcinoma.

Kidneys

Ankle hemangioma

A bony hemangioma can often be referred to as a few other names, primary intraosseous hemangioma or vascular hamartoma. A hemangioma is a benign vascular malformation that occurs when blood vessels multiply at an abnormal rate. They most commonly occur in the skull and the spine but they can form in any body part. Capillary and cavernous hemangiomas are the most common type of hemangioma to affect bones. The can occur on the surface of the bone or deeper. Often hemangiomas are asymptomatic and are found incidentally on an xray or MRI.

Ankles

Ovarian cyst

An ovarian cyst is a fluid filled sac within the ovary. It is a common finding on gynecological exams. Most ovarian cysts are benign in nature and harmless. On occasion they can twist the ovary (torsion) or burst. This can result in acute, severe pain.

Ovarian cysts are mostly related to ovulation. These types of cysts are:

  • Follicular cyst: most common. During menstruation a follicle containing the egg forms and ruptures when the egg is released. If the rupture doesn’t occur a follicular cyst forms. It measures more than 2.5cm
  • Corpus luteum cyst: these appear after ovulation. This type of cyst is the remnant of the follicle after the egg is released. It measure more than 3cm
  • Theca lutein cyst: occurs within the thecal layer of cells surrounding the oocytes(eggs). When influenced by excessive hCG(hormone), thecal cells may multiply and become cystic

Cysts that are not related to ovulation, non-functional, are:

  • Polycystic ovary syndrome: multiple cysts
  • Cyst resulting from endometriosis
  • Hemorrhagic ovarian cysts
  • Dermoid cysts
  • Ovarian serous cystadenoma
  • Ovarian mucinous cystadenoma
  • Borderline tumoral cysts

Ovaries

Bursitis of the ankle

A bursa fluid-filled sacs that cushion and lubricate bones and tendons when they move. The body is comprised of over 150 bursae. Bursitis is an inflamed or swollen bursa. The ankle has three main bursas. The retrocalcaneal bursa: located at the back of the ankle between the calcaneus (heel) and achilles tendon. The subcutaneous calcaneal bursa (achilles bursa) is located in the lower heel between the calcaneus and the skin. The subcutaneous bursa of the medial malleolus is located between the skin and the medial malleolus.

Ankles

Metastases in the nasal pharynx

Metastatic disease of the soft tissues of the nasopharynx occurs when cancer spreads from another location in the body and seeds in the neck tissues. The seeding can occur in glands, organs, muscles or lymph nodes of the neck.

Nasal pharynx

Indeterminant nodule of the hypopharynx

A nodule in the soft tissues of the neck describe a small lesion which is generally too small to be able to characterize as benign or potentially malignant. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from a single scan.

Hypopharynx

Fibromatosis of the ovary

Ovarian fibromatosis is a rare condition where mass-like enlargement occurs due to ovarian fibrosis. Ovarian fibrosis is the result of depletion of ovarian follicles and loss of ovarian function. This could be the result of damage or injury to the ovary (ie.surgery, chronic inflammation, other ovarian conditions). This is a benign finding.

Ovaries

Kidney stone

Kidney stones, also know as nephrolithiasis, are solid pieces of material that typically form in the kidney. They usually pass through the kidney, to the ureter, to the bladder, and exit when passing urine. Quite frequently they can occur and pass without symptoms.

The stone can develop when crystals that are formed from chemicals in your body stick together. Stones are typically made of calcium oxalate, occasionally made of uric acid or cystine. The stones can range in size from less than 5mm (grain size) to larger than 4cm (golf ball size).

Kidneys

Tarlov / perineural cyst

A Tarlov cyst (also known as a perineural cyst) is a contained outpouching of cerebrospinal fluid from the spinal canal around the normally exiting nerve between the vertebrae of the spine (at the neural foramen). These Tarlov cysts can slowly grow and erode the adjacent bony wall enlarging the neural foramen.

Spine

Diverticular disease

Diverticulosis also known as diverticular disease is a condition where there are numerous outpouches (diverticula) in the colon. These outpouchings occur due to weakened muscle layers of the bowel wall. When these diverticula become inflamed, they are known as diverticulitis.

The sigmoid colon is the most common location for diverticulosis due to the increased pressure exerted in this area, particularly when defecating.

This is often an asymptomatic, incidental finding.

Bowel

Hepatic biloma

A biloma is a benign collection of bile outside of the gallbladder and bile ducts. These are often found within the liver but can also be found elsewhere in the abdominal cavity. Small spontaneous bilomas are often asymptomatic. Post surgical and traumatic biloma formation can have non-specific symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, weight loss, jaundice, fever and abdominal tenderness.

Liver

Bursitis of the shoulder

A bursa is a fluid-filled sac that cushion and lubricates bones and tendons when they move. The body is comprised of over 150 bursae. Bursitis is an inflamed or swollen bursa. There are 5 main bursae in the shoulder:

  • Subacromial-deltoid bursa - located between the joint capsule and the deltoid muscle
  • Subscapular recess - located between the joint capsule and the subscapularis muscle
  • Subcoracoid bursa - located below the coracoid
  • Coracoclavicular bursa - located between the coracoid and the clavicle
  • Supra-acromial bursa - located above the acromion

Bursitis in the shoulder can occur in any of the bursae but the most common one is the subacromial-deltoid bursa. It is the largest bursa which is usually related to impingement between the rotator cuff and the acromion.

Shoulders

Breast cyst

A breast cyst is a fluid filled sac within the breast tissue. It is typically benign in nature. It is possible to have one or multiple breast cysts as well as affect one or both breasts. Breast cysts are usually round or oval in shape with a distinct capsule. On palpation a breast cyst feels like a grape or water filled balloon, they can also feel firm. Breast cysts can move easily, with touch, within the tissue. The cysts can change with the menstrual cycle, changing in size and tenderness.

This is a common finding in women between 35-50 years old, but not limited to that age range.

Breasts

Bile duct stricture

A bile duct stricture is a condition where the duct is narrower than it would normally be. This can cause poor fat digestion in the bowel. The cause of the stricture can be due to a benign cause (such as previous surgery or inflammation) or a malignant condition (such as cholangiocarcinoma or pancreatic cancer).

Gallbladder and biliary system

Uterine adenomyosis

Adenomyosis is a condition where endometrial tissue(inner layer of the uterus) is found in the myometrium (thick, muscular layer of the uterus). It is a condition similar to endometriosis. In up to 20% of the time, both adenomyosis and endometriosis are found together. It is associated with increased estrogen levels. Adenomyosis leads to the uterine wall thickening. The junctional zone of the uterus typically thickens, and With the diagnosis of adenomyosis it will measure 12mm or more. It typically resolves after menopause.

Uterus

Baker's cyst

A Baker's cyst (aka popliteal cyst) is a type of fluid collection behind the knee.

Knees

Enlargement of the thyroid

The enlarged thyroid is not a pathology, but is a possible indicator of an underlying pathology.

Thyroid

Muscle tear of the pelvis and hips

A muscle tear is an acute or chronic soft tissue injury that occurs to muscle. A minor tear is also referred to as strain. The muscle becomes overstretched and receives more physical stress than it can handle. The tears can occur partially or completely. Acute tears tend to happen with recent trauma or injury whereas chronic tears are related to repetitive movement over a long period of time.

Muscle tears are classified by degree of severity: first degree (mildest - some tearing still with full range of motion), second degree (moderate - torn, painful with limited motion) and third degree (severe - torn with limited or no movement).

Pelvis and hips

Arachnoid cyst

Arachnoid cysts are benign, usually asymptomatic lesions which usually occur in the brain, but may also appear in the spinal cord. They are filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).

Brain

Number of vertebrae

Most people have 7 cervical, 12 thoracic and 5 lumbar type vertebrae. However there are some congenital changes to this where some people can be born with more or less vertebrae. These variances become important for counting the nerve roots if you develop low back, leg or foot pain, and surgery is contemplated.

The spaces between the vertebrae called neural foramen are where the nerve roots exit from the spinal cord to the body, and each nerve is specifially named based on 8 cervical, 12 thoracic and 5 lumbar nerve roots.

Spine

Lymphoma in the lymph nodes of the neck

Lymphoma is a cancer which arises in the lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. Lymphoma can arise from, or spread to any of the glands and organs throughout the soft tissues of the neck (and many other locations within the body).

Cervical lymph node chain

Soft tissue abnormality

Soft tissue abnormalities listed under "Bony Skeleton and Soft Tissue" are findings that are not directly related to any of the prelisted organs.

Bony skeleton and soft tissue

Bone island of the spine

A bone island, also known as enostosis, is a benign, very dense region of compact bone within the normal bone structure. It is generally less than 2cm in size and is usually found incidentally. It is usually found incidentally. A condition where multiple bone islands occur is called osteopoikilosis.

Spine

Lung nodule

A lung nodule is a descriptor for a lesion of the lung which is generally less than 1cm in size. A lung nodule has the potential to be benign or malignant. As lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in North America, this finding must be followed up to ensure stability over time. There are more deaths from lung cancer than there are deaths from bowel, prostate, ovarian and breast cancer combined.

Lungs and mediastinum

Enlarged liver

An enlarged liver is a non-specific finding which has various causes. These include but are not limited to infection, tumors, metabolic disorder and alcoholism. The presentation of an enlarged liver is due to vascular swelling of the liver and inflammation.

Normal liver size in axial dimensions is 10-12cm(front to back) x 20-23cm.

Liver

Choledochal cyst

Choledochal cysts are rare cystic dilations of the bile ducts They are believed to be congenital (from birth) and are associated with biliary obstructions in infants. Remaining asymptomatic into adulthood is rare, but not unheard of. Choledochal cysts lead to an increased risk of biliary cancer. They are considered a pre-malignant state. This risk goes from 2% at age 20, to 75% at age 70.

There are 5 different classifications of choledochal cysts.

  • Type I - the most common, which relates to dilatation of the extrahepatic bile duct.
  • Type II - a diverticulum arising from the extrahepatic bile duct.
  • Type III - dilatation of the extrahepatic duct within the duodenal wall.
  • Type IV - Second most common with dilatations and cysts of intra and/or extrahepatic ducts.
  • Type V - Multiple dilatations and/or cysts of intrahepatic ducts only. This is also known as Caroli disease.

Gallbladder and biliary system

Effusion of the pelvis and hips

Swelling or edema is an abnormal collection of fluid located beneath the skin or in the joint space (joint effusion). It can result in the displacement of other structural components such as fat pads, ligaments, tendons or other bony structures.

Pelvis and hips

Uterine prolapse

A uterine prolapse is a condition where uterus is slipping down to vaginal passage. This happens when the ligaments of the uterus are stretched due to weakness in the pelvic floor.

Uterus

Sinus and mastoid polyp

Polyps are benign growths which can occur in the nasal passages or sinuses. They most commonly occur due to chronic inflammation due to asthma, infection and allergies. They may be entirely asymptomatic, or may cause symptoms. They occur in the mucous membrane of the nasal passages and sinuses.

Sinuses and mastoids

Pericardial effusion

The pericardium is the collective name for the layers of lining around the outside of the heart. A pericardial effusion refers to an abnormal amount of fluid inbetween the heart muscle and the pericardium. This increase in fluid leads to an increase in the pressure on the heart.

Heart and great vessels

Duplex ureter

Duplex ureter also known as duplicated collecting system, is when two ureters are coming from one kidney travelling to the bladder. They may both travel independently to the bladder or the two ureters may connect and enter the bladder as one ureter. Typically each kidney has one ureter that leads to the bladder. Duplex ureter is a congenital condition that occurs during the development of the fetus. It is a normal variant and the kidneys can function normally with two ureters. Quite often this condition is found incidentally on examinations for other concerns.

Having duplex ureters is associated with vesicoureteral reflux (backflow of urine from the bladder), ectopic ureter (where the ureter drains into somewhere other the bladder - this would be detected at an early age), and ureterocele (where there is ballooning at the end of the ureter that connects to the bladder).

Bladder and ureters

Spinal fracture

A fracture of a vertebra can be due to trauma, osteoporosis or a tumor invading the bone.

The compressive force of a traumatic injury is able to immediately fracture the vertebra (usually causing a “burst” or a “compression” fracture).

Osteoporosis and tumors destroy the bone matrix, eventually weakening the bone to the point of collapse under normal body weight or by a fall from standing height.

Spine

Ankle tumor

Bone tumours, or bone cancer, is a primary cancer that starts in the bone or cartilage. The tumours can be benign or malignant. It is more common in children, adolescents and young adults. The most common types of malignant bone tumours in young adults is chondrosarcoma and osteosarcoma. Other non-cancerous types are osteoma,osteoclastoma (giant cell tumours) and osteochondroma. Rarer types of bone cancer are: fibrosarcoma, angiosarcoma, and undifferentiated high-grade pleomorphic sarcoma. The tumour can grown into the bone as well as neighbouring tissue. Most are called sarcomas.

A chondrosarcoma is the most common in adults. It originates in the cartilage. It is typically found in the long bones - humerus and femur. It is a slow growing cancer.

Osteosarcoma is second most common bone cancer in adults. It is most often found in the knees, tibia,and long bones. It can also be found in the hips and jaw in older adults.

Soft tissue tumours can also occur. These include: lipomas, fibromas, desmoid tumours, leiomyoma, leiomyosarcoma, schwannoma, liposarcoma, synovial sarcoma, and neurosarcoma. Malignant soft tissue tumours in the ankle are rare.

Ankles

White matter disease

White matter disease is damage or loss of tissue in the largest and deepest part of your brain due to aging or other cause. This white matter tissue covers the millions of nerve fibers, or axons, that connect parts of the brain and spinal cord. This covering is made of fatty material called myelin that protects the nerve fibers and gives white matter its color. Myelin is also responsible for enabling rapid nerve signal transmission.

White matter brain tissue helps you think fast, walk straight, and keeps you from falling. When it becomes diseased, the myelin breaks down and the nerve signals no longer get through efficiently or sometimes at all.

Brain

Variant anatomy of hepatic vessels

Variant hepatic arterial anatomy:

Usually the common hepatic artery arises from celiac artery. Variant hepatic arterial anatomy refers to variations of this. This includes the hepatic artery arising directly from the aorta or the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), the right hepatic artery arising from the SMA, or the left gastric artery arising from the left gastric artery.

Variant hepatic venous anatomy:

This refers to a variation in the venous anatomy of your liver. The most common variation is an accessory right inferior hepatic vein. This vein drains the posterior portion of the right liver lobe directly into the inferior vena cava (IVC).

Liver

Polysplenia

Polysplenia is characterised by the formation of multiple accessory spleens without a full sized parent spleen. Polysplenia sometimes occurs in isolation, though it is often accompanied by other congenital abnormalities which affect cardiac formation.

Spleen

Hemorrhagic adenoma of the liver

A hemorrhagic adenoma is a hepatic adenoma which has ruptured and started to bleed. This is a serious yet rare, benign liver lesion. If a hepatic adenoma ruptures (hemorrhages) then there is a greater likelihood for abdominal pain and internal bleeding which can lead to serious complications.

Liver

Bladder wall thickening

Bladder wall thickening is a reactive action that happens when the bladder is working harder to expel urine, has become chronically irritated/inflamed or has been scarred. This is usually caused by another condition such as urinary tract infections, abnormal tissue growth, cancer, cystitis, amyloidosis or bladder obstruction.

Bladder and ureters

Muscle atrophy with fatty replacement of the ankle

Muscle atrophy is when the muscle either partially or completely wastes/decreases in mass. It can be associated with restricted movement/lack of physical activity or as the result of other conditions or diseases affecting the person.

Muscle atrophy can be broken into three different categories: physiologic, pathologic, and neurogenic. Physiologic is when the muscle is not being used enough. This can occur when a person is confined to a bed, has broken a limb, in places where there is no gravity or have a lifestyle with decreased activity levels. Pathologic is when the a person is suffering from other conditions such as aging, starvation, cancer, HIV, or Cushing disease. Neurogenic atrophy can be the result of injury or a disease that affects the nerves stimulating the muscles. Examples of these are: ALS, carpal tunnel syndrome, Guillain-Barre syndrome, toxins or alcohol, polio or a spinal cord injury.

Ankles

Breast tissue density

Breast tissue varies from woman to woman. The denser the breast the more glandular tissue it has versus fat tissue. Usually as females age the tissue becomes less glandular and as the glandular tissue gets replaced with fat. Dense glandular tissue is a normal finding particularly in women of childbearing age and dense tissue is becoming more recognized as requiring additional screening tests, such as MRI or ultrasound. Having dense breast tissue makes breast screening with mammography challenging.

Breasts

Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma

A mucinous cystadenocarcinoma is the malignant transformation of a mucinous cystadenoma. Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas tend to be a low grade tumor. Therefore they grow slower than other cancers and metastasize less often.

Pancreas

Effusion of the knee

Swelling or edema is an abnormal collection of fluid located beneath the skin or in the joint space (joint effusion). It can result in the displacement of other structural components such as fat pads, ligaments, tendons or other bony structures.

Knees

Indeterminant biliary lesion

An indeterminant lesion of the biliary system can potentially be a benign or a malignant lesion. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion.

Gallbladder and biliary system

Hiatus hernia

A hiatus hernia describes the occurrence of the abdominal contents projecting into the thoracic cavity. This is almost exclusively used to describe stomach contents projecting through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. When the stomach completely projects through the esophageal hiatus it is described as an intrathoracic stomach.

Stomach

Sarcoidosis

Sarcoidosis is an autoimmune disorder which involves a collection of inflammatory cells that form lumps, which are known as granulomas. Sarcoidosis can affect the lungs, skin, lymph nodes, liver, heart, brain and eyes. It is the lymph node and lung versions of sarcoidosis which this finding relates to.

Lungs and mediastinum

Perivascular space

A perivascular space, is a benign fluid filled space in the brain. They are simply a folding of the layering structures that surround a small blood vessel in the brain. These perivascular spaces are usually very small (smaller than 5mm). They are more commonly seen in elderly patients due to their enlargement with age and hypertension.

Brain

Lung consolidation

Consolidation occurs when the normal air within the lungs is replaced, usually in a small section, by pus, blood, water, food, tumor or another substance or organism that doesn’t belong. Once consolidation is seen, it needs to be determined why the consolidation occurred, and appropriate treatment should be promptly administered.

Lungs and mediastinum

Ankylosing spondylitis

Ankylosing spondylitis is a type of arthritis in which there is long term inflammation. It can occur in other parts of the body, particularly the spine, shoulders, hips and eyes. Over time the bones fuse together and create a rigid spine. It can range from mild to severe and possible result in changes in posture. Early diagnosis may help progression, reduce symptoms or prevent deformity.

Sacroiliac joints

Splenic artery aneurysm

Splenic artery aneurysms are the third most common abdominal aneurysm. The are usually saccular (bulging out one side of the artery) in shape. The majority of splenic artery aneurysms are incidental findings. There is a risk of the aneurysm spontaneously rupturing, particularly with people who undergo a liver transplant, have portal hypertension or are pregnant. If a splenic artery aneurysm ruptures, there is a 1 in 3 mortality rate.

Spleen

Adrenal lymphoma

The adrenal glands are a common site for lymphoma to spread to. It is also a rare site for lymphoma to originate. When lymphoma infiltrates the adrenal glands, the function of the adrenals may be affected, potentially causing adrenal insufficiency.

Adrenals

Indeterminant bone lesion

An indeterminate lesion of the bony skeleton can potentially be a benign or a malignant lesion. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from this scan.

Bony skeleton and soft tissue

Demyelinating plaque

Many nerves in the brain and spine are coated in myelin. Myelin is an insulating material which allows nerve signals to travel 100x faster than they would without the myelin. When the myelin around the nerves are damaged, these nerve signals are slowed. This damage is called demyelination. A demyelinating plaque is a localized region of demyelination. New myelin can grow in areas of damage, but the new myelin is thinner and not as effective.

Spine

Splenomegaly

Splenomegaly is an enlargement of the spleen. An anterior-posterior (front-back) measurement of greater than 10.5 cm is an indicator of splenomegaly. Massive splenomegaly is used to describe a spleen which weighs more than one kilogram. A cranio-caudal (head-foot) measurement of greater than 14.6 cm indicates massive splenomegaly.

Splenomegaly is usually associated with increased workload on the spleen, which suggests that it is a response to something that is causing the spleen to work harder than normal. Other conditions increasing the risk of splenomegaly include blood disorders, infection, metabolic disorders, cancers, trauma and connective tissue disorders. The range of conditions that could cause this is broad and so a finding often required follow-up and additional testing.

Spleen

Pituitary tumor

Pituitary tumors are abnormal growths which arise from the pituitary gland, which is located near the middle of your brain. The pituitary gland is responsible for producing many important hormones in the body responsible for growth, blood pressure and reproduction. The majority of pituitary tumors are benign and are called adenomas. There is the possibility that it is a cancerous tumor, but these are rare. Metastatic disease can deposit in the pituitary gland, but without a primary cancer diagnosis, this is highly unlikely. As this is most likely a benign adenoma, most of the information contained herein refers to a pituitary adenoma.

Brain

Horseshoe kidney

Horseshoe kidney is a congenital disorder where the kidneys fuse together to form a horseshoe shape. This occurs during fetal development. This is the most common renal fusion anomaly. The area that is joined together is called the isthmus.

Kidneys

Liver metastases

A hepatic metastasis (plural: metastases) is a malignant tumor of the liver which has spread from another organ which has cancer. Metastases are referred to as secondary cancers (the originating organ is referred to as the primary). The liver is a common location for metastatic disease due to the dual blood supply from the hepatic artery and the portal vein. Hepatic metastases are 20 times more common than a primary cancer originating in the liver. In 50% of all cases of hepatic metastases, the primary tumor is in the gastrointestinal tract.

Liver

Indeterminant cystic lesion of the neck lymph nodes

A cystic lesion of the soft tissues of the neck may be benign or could potentially be malignant. Statistically, cystic tumors are less likely to be malignant than solid tumors. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from a single scan.

Cervical lymph node chain

Enlargement of the oral pharynx

The enlargement of an organ or a gland is not a pathology, but is a possible indicator of an underlying pathology, or could be a normal variant.

Oral pharynx

Colitis

Colitis the general term used for inflammation of the large bowel. This can be from a bacterial, viral, fungal or parasitic infection. It could be a simple infection that will pass in a few days, or could be something that requires further treatment.

Bowel

Uterine neoplasm

A Uterine neoplasm is a malignant tumour that can metastasize to other parts of the body. It typically affects younger women with an average age of 45 years old. Uterine neoplasm can be classified based on the location: cervical, vaginal, and endometrial carcinomas.

Cervical carcinoma is the third most common gynaecological malignancy. The tissue type is classified by biopsy. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinomas are the most common tumours found in the cervix. Other less common types of cervical cancer are neuroendocrine tumours and adenosquamous cell carcinoma.

Vaginal carcinoma is rare, especially as primary cancer. However, it is the fifth most common gynaecological malignancy. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinomas are the most common tumours found in the vagina. Other less common types of vaginal cancer are primary vaginal melanoma and vaginal sarcoma.

Endometrial carcinoma is the most common gynaecological malignancy. Of the subtypes of endometrial carcinoma the majority are adenocarcinoma. Endometrial carcinoma is then divided into subtypes: Type I and Type II. Type I, which accounts for 80% of cases, are linked to excess estrogen in the body. Type II, accounts for 20%, are not linked to estrogen levels and involve endometrial atrophy.

Uterus

Spondylolisthesis

Spondylolisthesis is the term which is used to describe the slippage of one vertebra in relation to the adjacent vertebrae. Spondylolisthesis occurs most commonly in the lumbar spine, but can occur anywhere in the spine.

Spine

Cardiac metastases

Cardiac metastases are formed by the spread of cancer from other organs to the heart. Cardiac metastases are 40 times more likely to occur than a primary tumor of the heart. The most common cancers to spread to the heart are lung, breast, lymphoma, melanoma, mesothelioma, kidney, ovary, and stomach cancer.

Heart and great vessels

Enlargement in the nasal pharynx

The enlargement of an organ or a gland is not a pathology, but is a possible indicator of an underlying pathology, or it may be a result of prior treatment.

Nasal pharynx

Bone cyst of the pelvis and hips

There are three types of bone cysts: traumatic bone cyst, aneurysmal bone cyst and unicameral bone cyst. They are benign are do not spread to other parts of the body.

Traumatic bone cysts ten to occur in the jaw and facial bones after trauma.

Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABC) are typically found in children and adolescents They are composed of numerous blood-filled channels which creates an expanded lesion within the bone. The cause of these are unknown.

Unicameral bone cysts (simple bone cysts) are cysts or cavities that form in the bone and are filled with fluid. They are considered latent or active depending on their location. Active bone cysts are located near the epiphyseal plate and will continue to grow until it fills the entire diaphysis. Latent cysts are located away from the epiphyseal plate and will heal with treatment or resolve on their own.

Pelvis and hips

Bone island of the shoulder

A bone island, also known as enostosis, is a benign, very dense region of compact bone within the normal bone structure. It is generally less than 2cm in size and is usually found incidentally. A condition where multiple bone islands occur is called osteopoikilosis.

Shoulders

Abnormal spine curvature

Normal spine has the S-shape when viewed from the side. This curvature helps to distribute the weight evenly and also to maintain balance and move around. The abnormalities of these curves are called kyphosis and lordosis.

Kyphosis is excessive convex curving of the thoracic spine. It appears as bowing of the back (hunchback in severe cases) and slouching posture. Kyphosis can occur at any age, but is common during adolescence.

The abnormal inward curves at the cervical (neck) and lumbar spine are called lordosis, also sometimes called as swayback.

Spine

Wandering spleen

Wandering spleen is, as its name describes, a condition in which the spleen is not located in its usual position. It most commonly migrates to the lower abdomen or pelvis. It is more common in women who have had multiple pregnancies, as the suspensory ligaments of the spleen may be damaged with the growing fetus, allowing it to move.

Spleen

Solid lesion of the hypopharynx

A solid lesion of the soft tissues of the neck may be benign or could potentially be malignant. As a general rule, the more solid a lesion is, the greater the probability it is malignant. Statistically, greater than 50%of solid tumors are benign. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from a single scan.

Hypopharynx

Bursitis of the knee

A bursa fluid-filled sacs that cushion and lubricate bones and tendons when they move. The body is comprised of over 150 bursae. Bursitis is an inflamed or swollen bursa. There are 14 bursae in the knee:

  • suprapatellar bursa - between the lower femur and the quadriceps femoris
  • Prepatellar bursa - between the patella and the skin
  • Deep infrapatellar bursa - between the upper part of the tibia and the patellar ligament
  • Subcutaneous infrapatellar bursa - between the patellar ligament and skin
  • Pretibial bursa - between the tibial tuberosity and the skin
  • Lateral gastrocnemius bursa - between the lateral head of the gastrocnemius and the joint capsule
  • Fibular bursa - between the lateral collateral ligament and the tendon of the biceps femoris
  • Fibulopopliteal bursa - between the lateral collateral ligament and the tendons of the popliteus
  • Subpopliteal bursa - between the tendon of the popliteus and the lateral condyle of the femur
  • Medial gastrocnemius bursa - between the medial head of the gastrocnemius and the joint capsule
  • Pes anserinus bursa - between the medial collateral ligament and the tendons of the sartoris, gracilis, and semitendinosus
  • Bursa semimembranosa - between the medial collateral ligament and the tendon of the semimembranosus
  • There is one between the tendon of the semimembranosus and the head of the tibia
  • Occasionally there is a bursa between the tendons of the semimembranosus and semitendinosus

Bursitis in the knee can occur in any of the bursae but the most common ones are: suprapatellar bursa, prepatellar bursa, infrapatellar bursa and pes anserinus bursa.

Knees

Bone cyst of the knee

There are three types of bone cysts: traumatic bone cyst, aneurysmal bone cyst and unicameral bone cyst. They are benign are do not spread to other parts of the body.

Traumatic bone cysts ten to occur in the jaw and facial bones after trauma.

Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABC) are typically found in children and adolescents They are composed of numerous blood-filled channels which creates an expanded lesion within the bone. The cause of these are unknown.

Unicameral bone cysts (simple bone cysts) are cysts or cavities that form in the bone and are filled with fluid. They are considered latent or active depending on their location. Active bone cysts are located near the epiphyseal plate and will continue to grow until it fills the entire diaphysis. Latent cysts are located away from the epiphyseal plate and will heal with treatment or resolve on their own.

Knees

Spinal stenosis

Spinal stenosis is a condition in which the spinal canal (which contains the spinal cord, spinal nerves and cerebrospinal fluid) narrows to put pressure on the spinal cord nerves.

Spine

Cyst of the nasal pharynx

Simple cysts are abnormal, fluid-filled sacs that can form in any of the soft tissues of the neck. Simple cysts usually do not cause symptoms or harm the function of the tissue. Treatment is not needed for simple cysts that do not cause any symptoms.

Nasal pharynx

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common joint disease that results from breakdown of joint cartilage and underlying bone due to wear and tear. It is the most common type of arthritis becomes more common with age. Osteoarthritis affects typically knee, hip, finger, and lower back joints causing pain, stiffness, weakness, and swelling.

Sacroiliac joints

Tumefactive demyelinating lesion

A tumefactive demyelinating lesion usually presents as a solitary demyelinating lesion. It is usually a local, aggressive lesion which is over 2 cm in size. Unlike the Marburg variant, patient prognosis is generally more positive with a tumefactive demyelinating lesion. It is unusual for someone who presents with a solitary lesion to develop multiple sclerosis.

Brain

Irregular cystic lesion of the thyroid

Occasionally in the thyroid gland, unusual shaped fluid filled lesions are found that warrant surveillance or further investigation, as there is a chance that they may develop into a cancer.

Thyroid

Muscle tear of the bony skeleton

A muscle tear is an acute or chronic soft tissue injury that occurs to muscle. It is also referred to as strain. The muscle becomes overstretched and places more physical stress than it can exert on it. The tears can occur partially or completely. Acute tears tend to happen with recent trauma or injury whereas chronic tears are related to repetitive movement over a long period of time.

Muscle tears are classified by degree of severity: first degree (mildest - some tearing still with full range of motion), second degree (moderate - torn, painful with limited motion) and third degree (severe - torn with limited or no movement).

Bony skeleton and soft tissue

Renal angiomyolipoma

Renal angiomyolipomas (AML) are the most common benign tumor found in the kidney. They are composed of vascular cells, immature smooth muscle cells and fat cells. While they are classed as benign they can still affect the function of the kidney depending on their size and location. In most cases AML occur as a single mass, but rarely it can affect both kidneys and it is possible to have more than one at a time.

Angiomyolipoma is commonly associated with other diseases such as tuberous sclerosis (genetic disease) and lymphangioleiomyomatosis(a rare lung disease).

Kidneys

Effusion of the ankle

Swelling or edema is an abnormal collection of fluid located beneath the skin or in the joint space (joint effusion). It can result in the displacement of other structural components such as fat pads, ligaments, tendons or other bony structures.

Ankles

Generalized brain volume

Your brain volume changes over your lifespan. Peak volume is usually reached around 40 years of age after which the brain volume starts decline slowly about 5% per decade. Around 70 years of age the rate of decline increases. The shrinking is observed particularly in the frontal cortex of the brain. Gray matter volume seems to decline linearly with age whereas the white matter volume stays more constant. Males have higher peak volume and they also show faster decline rates. The reasons for the decline in brain volume are not completely clear.

Brain

Aortic aneurysm

An aortic aneurysm is an abnormal bulge that occurs in the wall of the major blood vessel (aorta) that carries blood from your heart to your body. Aortic aneurysms can occur anywhere in your aorta and may be tube-shaped (fusiform) or round (saccular).

Heart and great vessels

Bone island of the bony skeleton

A bone island, also known as enostosis, is a benign, very dense region of compact bone within the normal bone structure. It is generally less than 2cm in size and is usually found incidentally. A condition where multiple bone islands occur is called osteopoikilosis.

Bony skeleton and soft tissue

Prostate cyst

Prostatic cysts are abnormal fluid filled sacs that form in the prostate. They are a relatively common, benign finding. Cysts usually do not cause symptoms or harm the function of the prostate. Treatment is not needed for simple prostate cysts that do not cause any symptoms.

Prostate

Spleen appearance

Asplenia is the absence of a spleen. With asplenia, there are some serious risks associated with systemic infections. Asplenia may be congenital, developed over time, or post surgical.

In some cases, a part of the spleen can also be removed due to trauma, surgery or infection.

Spleen

Solid mass of the nasal pharynx

A solid mass of the soft tissues of the nasopharyngeal neck could potentially be malignant. As a general rule, the more solid a lesion is, the greater the probability it is cancer. Statistically howver, greater than 50% of solid masses are benign.

Nasal pharynx

Likely malignant lesion of the sinuses

A likely malignant lesion in the sinuses describes a tumor which has the imaging characteristics of a malignant lesion. In imaging we cannot usually be 100% definitive, but all the imaging indications make us concerned for this lesion.

Sinuses and mastoids

Cortical hyperplasia

Adrenal hyperplasia is the non-cancerous growth of the adrenal glands. In cases of adrenal cortical hyperplasia, the limbs of the affected adrenal is greater than 10mm in length and greater than 5mm in thickness. It is caused by the mutation of the genes which control the production of steroids from fats (steroidgenesis) in the adrenal glands.

Most commonly, the sex steroids (testosterone and estrogen) are affected with either excessive or deficient production. Adrenal cortical hyperplasia can also cause increased aldosterone or increased cortisol.

Symptoms of increased aldosterone (which causes Conn’s syndrome) includes high blood pressure, low potassium levels, weakness and cramps in your muscles. Increased cortisol (which causes Cushing’s syndrome) causes weight gain in the upper body, stretch marks, easy bruising, mood swings and increases the likelihood of developing diabetes.

Adrenals

Biliary hamartoma of the liver

Biliary hamartomas are rare benign liver lesions. They do not usually cause symptoms, hence are usually incidental findings. They are composed of small, disorganized clusters of dilated bile ducts. It is believed that they are congenital (from birth) embryonic bile ducts which didn’t form correctly. Biliary harmatomas have been associated with polycystic kidney disease and polycystic liver disease.

Liver

Bone island of the pelvis and hips

A bone island, also known as enostosis, is a benign, very dense region of compact bone within the normal bone structure. It is generally less than 2cm in size and is usually found incidentally. A condition where multiple bone islands occur is called osteopoikilosis.

Pelvis and hips

Choledocholithiasis

Choledocholithiasis refers to a gallstone from a stone which is not located within the gallbladder. Such locations include the cystic duct, common bile duct and hepatic ducts.

If these stones are small, they will pass through the common bile duct into the duodenum without causing any issues. If the stone is larger than the common bile duct, then they can cause an obstruction, causing choledocholecystitis (inflammation).

Gallbladder and biliary system

Caroli disease

Caroli disease is a congenital (from birth) disorder in which the bile ducts have cystic dilatation. Most common symptoms include right sided abdominal pain, inflamed bile ducts, and can progress to fever and jaundice. Most commonly, the symptoms present in childhood or young adulthood.

Liver

Lymphadenopathy

Lymphadenopathy is the presence of enlarged lymph nodes. These enlarged lymph nodes may be reactive to a local autoimmune or inflammatory process (e.g. sarcoidosis) or may be due to the spread of a malignancy. It is possible that the underlying cause may not be determined by the Prenuvo scan and the lymph nodes return to their normal size in time.

Lungs and mediastinum

Muscle atrophy with fatty replacement of the shoulder

Muscle atrophy is when the muscle either partially or completely wastes/decreases in mass. It can be associated with restricted movement/lack of physical activity or as the result of other conditions or diseases affecting the person.

Muscle atrophy can be broken into three different categories: physiologic, pathologic, and neurogenic. Physiologic is when the muscle is not being used enough. This can occur when a person is confined to a bed, has broken a limb, in places where there is no gravity or have a lifestyle with decreased activity levels. Pathologic is when the a person is suffering from other conditions such as aging, starvation, cancer, HIV, or Cushing disease. Neurogenic atrophy can be the result of injury or a disease that affects the nerves stimulating the muscles. Examples of these are: ALS, carpal tunnel syndrome, Guillain-Barre syndrome, toxins or alcohol, polio or a spinal cord injury.

Shoulders

Indeterminant ovarian lesion

An indeterminate ovarian lesion can potentially be a benign or a malignant lesion. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from this scan.

Ovaries

Endometriosis

Endometriosis is a condition where endometrial tissue, which lines the uterus, grows outside the uterus. It is a painful condition that affects the pelvic area. It can affect the fallopian tubes, ovaries and adjacent tissues in the pelvis. It can rarely spread outside of the pelvic region. The endometrium, despite being located outside the uterus, continues to act in the same way during the menstrual cycle. It thickens, breaks down, and bleeds. However, when located outside the uterus it is unable to exit the body and becomes irritated. This results in scar tissue and adhesions to form. It is best assessed by direct visualization at surgery.

Uterus

Prostate abscess

An abscess of the prostate is a collection of pus within the prostate gland that occurs as a result of prostatitis. An abscess is seen as a fluid filled collection within the prostate.

Prostate

Polyposis of the sinuses and mastoids

Polyps are benign growths which can occur in the nasal passages or sinuses. Polyps occur in the mucous membrane of the nasal passages and sinuses. The accumulation of numerous polyps is termed polyposis.

Sinuses and mastoids

Fat deposition to the liver

A fatty liver is the build-up of fat cells in the liver. Fat is primarily metabolized from an overconsumption of sugars and alcohol in our diet. The fat is stored in various locations in our body, including the liver.

If you have an overall liver fat percentage of below 5 percent your liver is consider healthy in terms of fat content. A person has a fatty liver when fat makes up 5 percent or more of the liver. Fatty liver can lead to fibrosis, scarring, hepatitis and cirrhosis.

Liver

Indeterminant lesion of the liver

We have detected a lesion in your liver. Unfortunately we cannot determine the exact nature of the lesion.

Liver

Recent fracture of the sacroilliac joint

Recent fractures are fractures that have occured within the last 2-3 months and are still in the healing process.

A bone fracture, also known as a broken bone, is a partial or complete break in the continuity of the bone. It can be a single fracture line or multiple fractured pieces. Fractures can occur from trauma, stress or from another pathology.

The different types of fractures are:

  • Displaced: the bone breaks into two or more parts and moves to out of alignment
  • Non-displaced: the bone breaks either part of all the way through but maintains alignment
  • Closed: the bone breaks but no puncture or open wound in the skin
  • Open: when the bone breaks and punctures the skin; these fractures are at risk of infection

Fractures are placed into subtypes:

  • Comminuted: broken into several pieces
  • Transverse: fracture line is perpendicular to the long part of the bone
  • Oblique: fracture line is on an angle through the bone
  • Pathologic: caused by a disease that weaken the bone
  • Stress: hairline crack

Healing of the bone starts almost immediately. It can be visualized on an x-ray within 6 weeks in adults.

Sacroiliac joints

Shoulder hemangioma

A bony hemangioma can often be referred to as a few other names, primary intraosseous hemangioma or vascular hamartoma. A hemangioma is a benign vascular malformation that occurs when blood vessels multiply at an abnormal rate. They most commonly occur in the skull and the spine but they can form in any body part. Capillary and cavernous hemangiomas are the most common type of hemangioma to affect bones. The can occur on the surface of the bone or deeper. Often hemangiomas are asymptomatic and are found incidentally on an xray or MRI.

Shoulders

Polycystic kidney disease

Polycystic kidney disease (PKD, also known as polycystic kidney syndrome) is a hereditary genetic disorder in which the renal tubules’ structure becomes abnormal resulting in multiple cysts growing on the kidneys. This can happen at any time during the lifespan from during fetus development into adulthood.

Cysts replace functioning tubules with non-functioning tubules and can be anywhere in size from microscopic to enormous and affect adjacent functioning tubules.

There are two types of polycystic kidney disease: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (most common) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. Both are hereditary with the latter affecting babies within the first few weeks of life and often associated with undeveloped kidneys.

Kidneys

Renal lipoma

Renal lipomas are benign tumours found in the kidney composed of fat cells or mature adipocytes. Lipomas commonly occur all over the body but rarely occur in the kidney. They can occur in any part of the kidney but typically occur in the cortex, the outer edge of the kidney

Kidneys

Adrenal pseudocyst

A pseudocyst is a cyst which does not have epithelial or endothelial cells. Pseudocysts constitute approximately 40% of all adrenal cysts. The cysts can grow quite large (larger than 10cm). Pseudocysts are more likely to cause symptoms than simple cysts, often because of their size.

Adrenals

Balo concentric sclerosis

Balo concentric sclerosis is characterized by the appearance of the areas of demyelination appearing in concentric circles. Balo concentric sclerosis is considered a borderline form of multiple sclerosis. Unlike the Marburg variant, patient prognosis is generally more positive with Balo’s concentric sclerosis. With Balo concentric sclerosis, progression is common, remission is possible and asymptomatic cases are rare.

Brain

Bowel carcinoid

Carcinoids are slow growing neuroendocrine tumors which can grow without causing symptoms for years. The small bowel is the most common location within the gastrointestinal tract for carcinoid tumor to develop (40%) although they can develop anywhere within the gastrointestinal tract. Metastasis rates increase with an increase in tumor size.

Bowel

Ureterocele

A ureterocele is a congenital abnormality found in the ureter. It is when the distal(lower) ureter is enlarged where it enters into the bladder forming a sac-like pouch. It is commonly associated with a duplex collecting system. This is when two ureters exit one kidney. However, it can occur with a normal collecting system.

As prenatal ultrasound has become a regular exam most ureteroceles are diagnosed prenatally.

There are six classifications of ureteroceles:

  • Intravesical: confined within the bladder
  • Ectopic: some part extends to the bladder neck or urethra
  • Stenotic: intravesical ureterocele with a narrow opening
  • Sphincteric: ectopic ureterocele with an orifice distal to the bladder neck
  • Sphincterostenotic: orifice is both stenotic and distal to te bladder neck
  • Cecoureterocele: ectopic ureterocele that extends into the urethra, but the orifice is in the bladder.

Uterus

Indeterminant splenic lesion

We have detected a lesion in your spleen. Unfortunately we cannot determine the exact nature of the lesion.

Spleen

Adrenal adenoma

Adrenal adenomas are benign, usually asymptomatic lesions arising from the cortex (outer component) of the adrenal gland. On imaging, the adenomas can be classified as typical or atypical. Typical adenomas are able to be confidently identified on your Prenuvo scan. They are usually less than 3cm in size and do not have restricted diffusion. Atypical adenomas are not able to be classified and will need repeat imaging to see if they change”

Of the typical adenomas, they can be further classified as functional or nonfunctional based on whether the adenoma leads to an increased secretion from within the adrenal gland. Only 5% of all adenomas are functional. The symptoms of a functioning adenoma are related to the location of the adenoma within the adrenal gland, causing them to secrete higher than usual amounts of either cortisol, aldosterone or reproductive hormone.

Adrenals

Crohn's disease

Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory bowel disease that most commonly affects the end of the small bowel. It affects extensive sections of the bowel at a time. It causes inflammation and ulceration of the bowel wall which can cause a fistula, where two sections of bowel can join onto each other. There is no obvious cause and no definitive cure, but there are numerous symptom management options available.

Bowel

Neurocysticercosis

Neurocysticercosis is caused by a tapeworm infection acquired from pork. They appear as small egg like lesions in the brain. They can number from a few to many. It is more common in lower socio-economic countries. The pigs acquire the tapeworm from ingesting human feces. It is passed back to humans either from undercooked foods or from drinking water contaminated by the tapeworm eggs. It is the most common cause of acquired epilepsy in the world.

Brain

Transverse myelitis

Acute transverse myelitis is an inflammatory process of the spinal cord which causes rapid progression of motor, sensory and autonomic nerve dysfunction.

Spine

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the benign enlargement of the prostate. It is caused by the overgrowth of cells in the transition zone of the prostate. This causes compression of the urethra, which transports urine from the bladder when you urinate.

Prostate

Lymphoma of the sinuses

Lymphoma is a cancer which arises in the lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. Lymphoma can arise from any of the sinuses (and many other locations within the body).

Sinuses and mastoids

Indeterminant cystic tumor of the hypopharynx

A cystic tumor of the soft tissues of the neck may be benign or could potentially be malignant. Statistically, cystic tumors are less likely to be malignant than solid tumors. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from this scan.

Hypopharynx

Scoliosis

Scoliosis is a condition where a person has a sideways curve of the spine. There is usually one dominant curve and a more subtle compensatory curve. Scoliosis is usually asymptomatic, though in severe cases it can cause back pain and can even affect one’s breathing.

Spine

Angiosarcoma of the liver

Angiosarcoma is a form of cancer which originates in the lining of a blood vessel, the endothelium. Because this cancer originates in a blood vessel or lymphatic vessel, the cancer cells are able to be carried to distant sites, where it can metastasize. The liver and lungs are common sites for metastases to develop.

Workers in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) polymerization plants and those in contact with arsenic containing insecticides are at a higher risk of developing angiosarcoma.

Liver

Hemangioma of the pelvis and hips

A bony hemangioma can often be referred to as a few other names, primary intraosseous hemangioma or vascular hamartoma. A hemangioma is a benign vascular malformation that occurs when blood vessels multiply at an abnormal rate. They most commonly occur in the skull and the spine but they can form in any body part. Capillary and cavernous hemangiomas are the most common type of hemangioma to affect bones. The can occur on the surface of the bone or deeper. Often hemangiomas are asymptomatic and are found incidentally on an xray or MRI.

Pelvis and hips

Hemangioma

A hemangioma is the most common bone lesion. It is benign and almost always asymptomatic. A hemangioma is composed of vascular spaces which displaces the regular bone matrix. They generally grow very slowly. The majority of hemangiomas occur in the thoracic spine.

Spine

Bone island of the knee

A bone island, also known as enostosis, is a benign, very dense region of compact bone within the normal bone structure. It is generally less than 2cm in size and is usually found incidentally. A condition where multiple bone islands occur is called osteopoikilosis.

Knees

Cystic hepatic metastases

Cystic hepatic metastases are most commonly associated with stomach, small and large bowel ovarian and pancreatic cancers. The internal cystic component is associated with breakdown of the inner part of the tumor (necrosis) which occurs when the tumor outgrows its blood supply. It may also represent a mucinous component, similar to the primary cancer.

Liver

Indeterminant lesion of the sinuses

An indeterminate lesion in the sinuses neck describe a small lesion which may be benign or could potentially be malignant. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from this scan.

Sinuses and mastoids

Deviated nasal septum

The nasal septum is the bone and cartilage that divides the nose into a left and right nostril. A deviated nasal septum is a physical condition where, as the name describes, the inner central component of the nose is curved or offset to one side. Around 80% of people with a deviated nasal septum are completely unaware they have this condition, which also indicates its relative insignificance.

Sinuses and mastoids

Indeterminant breast lesion

An indeterminate breast lesion can potentially be a benign or a malignant lesion. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from this scan.

Breasts

Urinary tract metastases

A bladder metastasis (plural: metastases) is a malignant tumor of the bladder which has spread from another organ which has cancer. Metastases are referred to as secondary cancers. The originating organ is referred to as the primary. The metastases of the bladder are commonly from other pelvic cancers such as prostate, colorectal or cervical.

Bladder and ureters

Irregular cystic tumor of the oral pharynx

A cystic tumor of the soft tissues of the neck may be benign or could potentially be malignant. Statistically, cystic tumors are less likely to be malignant than solid tumors. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from a single scan.

Oral pharynx

Hemorrhagic hypertensive microangiopathy

Hemorrhagic hypertensive microangiopathy occurs as a result of long term elevated blood pressure. It is evidenced by microhemorrhages of the small blood vessels of the brain. This damages the white matter of the brain. Hypertensive microangiopathy is more commonly seen in people over the age of 60.

Brain

Shoulder metastases

Bone metastases or osseous metastatic disease are cancerous lesions that the result of spread from another primary cancer (a cancer somewhere else in the body). They are more common than primary bone cancer. Some of the most common cancers to spread to bones are: breast, prostate, lung, kidney and thyroid.

Metastatic disease affect the regular process of decay and growth of bone. As a result the structure of the bone changes. There are two type of bone metastases, osteoblastic metastases and osteolytic metastases. Osteoblastic(sclerotic) metastases occur when cancer cells invade and cause too many bone cells to form. The bone then becomes very dense. Osteolytic metastases occur when the cancer breaks down too much bone resulting in it being destroyed and weakened. The former is the more common type.

Shoulders

Thyroid cyst

A simple cyst of the thyroid is a fluid-filled sac that can form in any of the soft tissues of the neck. Simple cysts usually do not cause symptoms or harm the function of the tissue. Treatment is not needed for simple cysts that do not cause any symptoms.

Thyroid

Brain mass

A brain mass is a concerning lesion that has the possibility of being a tumor.

Brain

Knee metastases

Bone metastases or osseous metastatic disease are cancerous lesions that the result of spread from another primary cancer (a cancer somewhere else in the body). They are more common than primary bone cancer. Some of the most common cancers to spread to bones are: breast, prostate, lung, kidney and thyroid.

Metastatic disease affects the regular process of decay and growth of bone. As a result the structure of the bone changes. There are two type of bone metastases, osteoblastic metastases and osteolytic metastases. Osteoblastic metastases occur when cancer cells invade and cause too many bone cells to form. The bone then becomes very dense (sclerotic). Osteolytic metastases occur when the cancer breaks down too much bone resulting in it being destroyed and weakened. The former is the more common type.

Knees

Sinusitis

Sinusitis is an infection of one or more of the sinuses of the head. Sinusitis can be acute or chronic.

Sinuses and mastoids

Bone cyst of the bony skeleton

There are three types of bone cysts: traumatic bone cyst, aneurysmal bone cyst and unicameral bone cyst. They are benign are do not spread to other parts of the body.

Traumatic bone cysts tend to occur in the jaw and facial bones after trauma.

Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABC) are typically found in children and adolescents They are composed of numerous blood-filled channels which creates an expanded lesion within the bone. The cause of these are unknown.

Unicameral bone cysts (simple bone cysts) are cysts or cavities that form in the bone and are filled with fluid. They are considered latent or active depending on their location. Active bone cysts are located near the epiphyseal plate and will continue to grow until it fills the entire diaphysis. Latent cysts are located away from the epiphyseal plate and will heal with treatment or resolve on their own.

Bony skeleton and soft tissue

Split cord malformation

A split cord malformation, or “diastematomyelia” is a congenital (from birth) disorder in which, as the name states, part of the spinal cord is split. This usually occurs at the upper lumbar spine level.

The spinal cord can reunite again further down the spine, though this is not always the case. The division of the spinal cord can be caused by the presence of bone, cartilage or a fibrous septum.

Cord malformation may be isolated, though it is more commonly found in people who have spina bifida, scoliosis or other congenital vertebral defects.

Spine

Bladder diverticula

A bladder diverticulum (plural: diverticula) is a pouch in the bladder wall. It occurs when some of the bladder lining pokes through a weak part of the bladder wall.

You were either born with it the diverticulum ("congenital") or developed it later ("acquired") due to chronic issues which affect the emptying of the bladder.

Bladder and ureters

Gastric adenocarcinoma

Gastric adenocarcinoma is the most common form of gastric malignancy. It arises from glandular epithelial cells in the stomach. The cancer invades the wall of the stomach. If found early, gastric adenocarcinoma is able to be treated without chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

Stomach

Indeterminant prostate lesion

An indeterminate prostate lesion can potentially be a benign or a malignant lesion. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion from this scan.

Prostate

Renal oncocytoma

Renal oncocytoma is a benign kidney mass. They are made up of oncocytes, a type of cell epithelial cell. As with a lot of renal masses they are typically asymptomatic and discovered on an examination for another reason.

Renal oncocytomas typically affect males of over the age of 50. They can be a solitary mass or occur in multiples affecting one or both kidneys. People with genetic syndromes such as tuberous sclerosis complex and Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome can be more affected by renal oncocytomas.

Kidneys

Brain hemorrhage

A brain hemorrhage can occur as a result of an artery or a vein in the brain rupturing. An arterial rupture will often cause immediate coma and death, hence is unlikely to be visualised in the setting of a Prenuvo scan and therefore only the venous type will be discussed herein. A venous rupture can cause a slower bleed which still requires prompt medical attention.

Brain

Bone marrow edema of the shoulder

Bone marrow is a semi-solid tissue which is found within the spongy or cancellous portions of bone. It is responsible for the production of new blood cells. Bone marrow edema is the term used when there is a fluid collection within the bone marrow. It is usually presence when there is an underlying condition. Conditions it could be related to can include: trauma, fracture, arthropathy, hypoperfusion, infection, post-operative changes, chemotherapy, bone metastases, or arthritis.

Shoulders

Endometrioma

An endometrioma is a type of cyst that forms when the endometrial tissue grows outside the endometrium.. It is a benign growth and the most common type of endometriosis. It is typically located on or near the ovaries. Normal endometrial tissue, during the menstrual cycle, thicken, breaks down, bleeds and exits the body. When it is located outside the uterus it has no way to exit and forms the endometriomas. If an endometrioma grows larger than 9cm in diameter, (approximately 1%) there is a possibility for the endometrioma to turn malignant.

Endometriomas that are smaller than 5mm are considered early stage disease, and may be too small to be seen other than at surgery. Endometriomas that are larger than 15mm are considered advanced stage disease.

Uterus

Bone marrow edema of the pelvis and hips

Bone marrow is a semi-solid tissue which is found within the spongy or cancellous portions of bone. It is responsible for the production of new blood cells. Bone marrow edema is the term used when there is a fluid collection within the bone marrow. It is usually present when there is an underlying condition. Conditions it could be related to can include: trauma, fracture, arthropathy, hypoperfusion, infection, post-operative changes, chemotherapy, bone metastases, or arthritis.

Pelvis and hips

Indeterminant lesion of the brain

An indeterminate lesion of the brain can potentially be a benign or a malignant lesion. Unfortunately we are unable to determine the exact nature of the lesion

Brain

Hepatocellular carcinoma

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of primary liver cancer. It can develop secondary chronic liver inflammation with causes ranging from hepatitis B and C to alcohol, hemochromatosis as well as fatty liver disease.

Liver

Meningioma

A meningioma the most common brain tumor. It forms from the meninges, the membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord. Meningiomas are often benign (not cancerous) and don't necessarily need treatment. Symptoms (if any) as well as treatment options depend on the location of the meningioma.

Brain

Degeneration of the shoulder

Degenerative joint disease or degenerative arthritis (osteoarthritis) is the most common condition to affect joints. It is a chronic condition. It is in two forms: primary and secondary. Primary is less common and occurs without cause or injury. It is hereditary. Secondary is the most common form and caused by mechanical forces such as obesity, previous injury, trauma or joint stress.

Degenerative joint disease occurs when the cartilage breaks down causing the bones to rub together. Typically it occurs in the older population.

Shoulders

Adrenal abscess

An adrenal abscess is a rare pus filled benign lesion of the adrenal gland. The abscess usually accumulates secondary to an acute infection elsewhere in the body which has spread through the bloodstream to the adrenal glands.

Adrenals

Hydatid cyst

Hydatid cysts are formed as a result of an infection of Echinococcus, commonly known as tapeworm. When the eggs of a tapeworm are ingested, the embryo which are released from an egg form the hydatid cyst. The egg grows 5-10cm in the first year and is able to survive for years, even decades.

Liver
 
Some general advice about our screening products:
  • All Prenuvo scans are generally effective for visualization of lesions on the order of 1 cm or larger within the chest, abdomen and pelvis and for Head & Torso and Comprehensive within the neck and head
  • No Prenuvo scan evaluates the heart in detail, although we do see evidence of atherosclerosis (a leading cause of heart attacks) in other organs of the body.
  • No Prenuvo scan evaluates detailed lung microarchitecture but will assess for mediastinal/hilar adenopathy/carcinoma.
  • All Prenuvo scans are limited in the evaluation of the hollow viscus (bowel and stomach) but will detect bowel carcinoma constricting the colon.
  • No cartilage-based sequences are performed for any Prenuvo scan which limits detailed assessment of the joints.
  • As with any medical test, due to many factors including state of disease progression, body physiology, body position and body movement, there are limitations which make it impossible to detect all malignancies and conditions listed above