See your cancer risk now

In a few minutes, learn from leading researchers on what your personal lifestyle, diet, symptoms and family history say about your own cancer risk.

Assess the risk of 26 cancers

Check your risk of all the most common cancers against 206 different risk variables in your life.

Dive into each cancer

Learn more about how you can detect cancer early and how Prenuvo might be able to help.

Explore each risk factor

For each risk factor, we have read hundreds of research reports from leading research institutes so you don't have to.

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See your cancer risk now

In a few minutes, learn from leading researchers on what your personal lifestyle, diet, symptoms and family history say about your own cancer risk.

Assess the risk of 26 cancers

Check your risk of all the most common cancers against 206 different risk variables in your life.

Dive into each cancer

Learn more about how you can detect cancer early and how Prenuvo might be able to help.

Explore each risk factor

For each risk factor, we have read hundreds of research reports from leading research institutes so you don't have to.

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Cancers evaluated
Risk factors
Reports generated

Risk factors we investigate

We have read hundreds of studies from leading academic institutions to put together what we believe is the most comprehensive survey in the world to assess your cancer risk.
  • Your symptoms right now
  • Demographics
  • Exercise and fitness
  • What you eat and drink
  • Where you work
  • Family history
  • Cancer history
  • Lifestyle choices
  • and more ...

Demographics

Are you white? Are you female? Are you over 50? Everyone's baseline risk for certain cancers change based on sex, age and ethnicity. And the factors that increase or decrease your risk might surprise you!

Diet

Do you drink a lot of milk? A fan of processed meats? Love leafy vegetables? Your diet can have a big impact on your cancer risk. In fact, there are certain foods that, if consumed regularly, can significantly increase or reduce your cancer risk.

Exercise and fitness

We all know that our weight and physical activity can have an impact on cancer incidence, but do you know how this changes with age and type of activity?

Job

Have you spent a lot of time around rubber? Work in forestry? Are you a firefighter? Ever been around asbestos or pesticides? There are many jobs that expose us to different chemicals which can alter our risk of specific cancers.

Lifestyle

Are you a party animal? Do you smoke? Have you taken certain drugs? Are you a big city or small city girl? Our lifestyle choices can have an impact on our cancer risk.

Women's health

Did you get your period early in life? How many children have you had and how did you give birth? How long were you on the pill or take HRT? Women face unique cancer challenges that are influenced by many factors.

Men's Health

When was your last PSA test? What score did you have? While men are more likely to get cancer as a result of lifestyle factors, several things can impact their prostate cancer risk.

Health history

Ever had mono? Do you have diabetes? Had an organ transplant? There are lots of medical conditions that can affect your risk of getting cancer.

Cancer history

While cancer is the result of random genetic mutations, a previous cancer diagnosis raises your risk of recurrence or other cancers if you have a genetic susceptibility.

Your symptoms

Sensitive nipples? Nighttime urination? Frequent belching? Many early cancer symptoms are generic, but there are some you should watch for in particular.

Family history

Certain genetic mutations that run in families can raise your cancer risk. Your family cancer history is an important determinant of your individual risk.

Screening history

Many cancers grow slowly, which is why routine screening is often only conducted every few years. Whether or not you have done your recommended screening (or a Prenuvo scan) impacts your risk of cancer today.

What others are saying about the free report

Tens of thousands of people in British Columbia have received a report on their cancer risk.
  • Silvie

    I found the survey to be comprehensive and insightful. I learned I had several risk factors related to having children I wasn't aware of.

    Silvie Vancouver, BC
  • Antonia

    It clearly took a lot of work to put together and I think everyone should know how their lifestyle affects their cancer risk.

    Antonia Burnaby, BC
  • Hannah

    I was actually surprised by the impact that exercise, alcohol and diet have on the risk of lots of cancers.

    Hannah West Vancouver, BC
  • Ream

    It was good to have the various impacts quantified and with backup science. I don't know why the cancer society doesn't provide something like this.

    Rema Vancouver, BC
  • Richard

    I have worked in the forestry industry most of my life. While it has made me fit (+) it also exposed me to chemicals that raise my kidney cancer risk (-).

    Richard Kamloops, BC
  • Tracy

    I was encouraged to visit the doctor after some of the symptoms I was feeling were correlated with liver and colon cancer. You can never be too careful.

    Tracy North Vancouver, BC
  • Trent

    What did I learn? Mainly that its hard to live life without affecting your risk one way or the other. But I was glad I did the survey.

    Trent Vancouver, BC
  • Evan

    As a former smoker, I'm going to investigate getting a preventative scan, not just for lung cancer but for the many cancers for which I have higher risk.

    Evan Delta, BC
  • Clare

    I thought the survey was really good and worth the time to answer a few questions. It confirmed some things and I learned some new things to moderate in my life.

    Clare Surrey, BC

9 other people are generating their reports right now.

Designed by Dr Raj Attariwala
Dr Attariwala is a global expert in early cancer detection. A leading physician and radiologist in Canada, Dr Attariwala received his training at several prestigious US institutions including Northwestern, UCLA and Memorial Sloan Kettering. "New screening tests and cancer treatments makes early detection even more important", Dr Attariwala believes," so it is more important now than ever to know what cancers you might be at risk of so you can monitor them more closely or make adjustments."
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